Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate (Topical)

Used to help combat persistently oily skin, Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate is a useful medicine but requires a doctor's prescription.

Overview

Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate is a lotion-style medicine that is typically prescribed for use to combat oily skin. This medicine is something you will need to receive over-the-counter, and should not be self-prescribed. Keep reading for more information regarding the safe use of Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate and any unexpected effects it may have, beyond reducing oily skin.

Condition(s) treated

  • Oily skin

Type of medicine?

  • Liquid
  • Pad

Side Effects

With regards to older geriatric patients, there have not actually been any studies of Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate used specifically in this age group. However, though no such tests have specifically taken place, it is not expected to differ in its effects to what it would with younger patients.

As like many medicines, Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate may have some unwanted and unexpected side effects. These do not necessarily affect everybody and it can be hard to predict whether a patient will be affected. Here are some potential side effects that could possibly occur.

  • Skin infection
  • Swelling of the skin
  • Harsh irritation
  • Pain and redness

It may well be the case that some of these side effects are not painful or limiting in any way, but are more of an unexpected inconvenience. In such a case, it may not be necessary to seek urgent medical care, though if you are concerned, then please do.

Your doctor may be able to prescribe you an alternative form of medicine to Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate. They may, in fact, provide alternative measures to help you reduce the side effects you experience or prevent them altogether.

However, if you get a burning pain or stinging of the skin which is persistent, or gets worse, then do contact a healthcare professional. If you experience any other side effects that are not on this list, then it may be best to contact your doctor as well.

Dosage

Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate should not be consumed without a prescription, and without having first discussed your required dosage with the doctor. As stated throughout, Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate is known to have certain reactions with a number of other medicines, food stuffs, alcohol and tobacco.

They will prescribe the strength of the Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate, and highlight how many doses you are to take each day and the time to wait between each dose. Also, be sure to check the label before taking. Under no circumstances should you increase your dosage beyond what you have been recommended to do so by a trained medical professional.

Typically speaking here is the recommended required dosage of Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate:

  • For adults and children aged above 8 years old - Apply Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate to the area of oily skin affected, and do so 2 to 4 times a day as needed.
  • For children aged below 8 years old, usage is not recommended.

If you have missed a dose, but are already about to take your next required dose of the day, then simply skip your missed dose. If you have realized you missed your dose, but it is not yet time for the next dose to be applied, then take the missed dose immediately.

Whenever handling Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate, keep it away from your eyes, your lips and the inside of your nose. These are areas that are highly sensitive and irritable if they come into contact with the medication. When applying, be sure that you are not near an open flame and not smoking, as Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate can be flammable.

To apply Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate:

  • First, place a small amount of the lotion onto a cotton ball or gauze pad.
  • Next, wipe the lotion gently over your face to remove any necessary areas covered in dirt or surface oil.
  • Afterwards, do not wash your face as this will remove any remaining Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate. Instead, leave it on their to help protect against further build up.
  • Alternatively, you may need to use a pledget, though it works in much the same manner.

Interactions

Whenever you take any medicines, you need to fully discuss with your doctor what sort of interactions it may have with other medication you are on, or other parts of your dietary intake. To get an idea of what interactions Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate may have with other medicines, you can discuss this with your doctor.

It may well be the case that, despite there being an interaction, you will still be able to take Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate. It may just be that they decide to drop your dose of either that medication or the dose of another you are taking.

However, if you currently suffer from burns or wounds, and these lie in the areas affected by oily skin, then do not treat these areas. Applying Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate to burns or wounds can cause severe irritation.

When it comes to using Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate, it should be warned that interactions with tobacco can occur. You should be aware of this and clearly disclose whether or not you smoke. They can then advise whether or not the amount you smoke each day is over the recommended level of tobacco.

Whilst on this topic, also be sure to discuss your eating and drinking habits, as certain foods and higher amounts of alcohol may cause an interaction.

Before you apply any Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate, it is recommended that you do not perform any of the following to the same affected area (unless told to do so by your doctor):

  • Use soaps or cosmetics which dry your skin
  • Clean using abrasive soaps
  • Apply medicated cosmetics
  • Use another topical skin medicine
  • Use a topical acne preparation which contains a peeling agent (e.g. resorcinol, sulfur, tretinoin, salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide)
  • Apply alternative alcohol-based substances

It is likely that using any of the above will further irritate your skin and act against Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate.

Warnings

It should be clearly stated that Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate should not be used on children who are 8 years old or younger. There are no clinical trials which have tested the use of Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate with other age groups. However, it is expected that it should not necessarily cause problems to those older than 8.

With regards to allergies, before taking Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate you need to clearly tell your doctor if you have ever had a reaction to it in the past. You also need to make it clear which past drugs, foods, animals, preservatives, and dyes you have had a reaction to. You can never be sure as to how Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate could react with these other allergies, but your doctor can advise you.

Under no circumstance should you apply Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate to areas affected by burns or wounds, as it can cause severe irritation.

As always, for any non-prescription products that you consume, you should carefully read any labeling and packaging and consult with your doctor if you are worried it will affect you taking Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate.

Storage

The medicine should be kept inside of a closed container and stored at room temperature. To maintain integrity, store it away from direct sunlight, moisture, and heat. Wherever you choose to store it, make sure it is kept well away from children, as it can be very hazardous. Finally, and as with all medicines, do not store and use if it is out of date. If you require more for treatment then once again visit your doctor. Similarly, if finished with, then dispose any remaining contents safely.

Summary

Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate is a very useful prescription medication in combating persistent oily skin. However, it can be harmful if used incorrectly and without proper guidance. Under no circumstance should you self-medicate the use of Acetone, Isopropyl Alcohol, and Polysorbate. Instead, always seek professional medical advice from your doctor. Based on previous health conditions or other allergies you hold, they may advise against its use. For this reason, it is vital that you are open and honest with your doctor at all times, and never try to alter the truth in any way to dissuade their judgment. Persistently oily skin is annoying, but there are various forms of treatment to help combat it. It will be at your doctor's discretion to find the most appropriate course of action for you to follow.

Resources
Last Reviewed:
December 10, 2017
Last Updated:
April 05, 2018
Content Source: