Levobunolol (Opthalmic)

Ophthalmic levobunolol is a medication that treats conditions relating to high pressure within the eye.

Overview

Ophthalmic levobunolol is a medication that is used to treat certain eye conditions. It is used to treat open-angle com/health/coma/">glaucoma and ocular hypertension.

Open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension are both conditions that cause or result from high pressure within the eye. Levobunolol reduces pressure within the eye by reducing the eye's fluid production. By lowering the high pressure within the eye, levobunolol helps to prevent blindness in people with these conditions.

Levobunolol is taken in the form of eye drops, usually once or twice per day. Make sure you follow all of your doctor's instructions on how to take levobunolol. Do not change your dosage without talking to your doctor about it first. Do not stop taking levobunolol if you start feeling better. You will have the best results from levobunolol if you are using it regularly.

To use levobunolol, wash your hands and remove contact lenses if you wear them. Wait fifteen minutes after removing your contact lenses. Gently pull your lower eyelid away from your eye, and drop one drop of levobunolol between the lower lid and the eye. When the drop is in your eye, close your eyes and look down for one or two minutes, while placing gentle pressure on the inner corner of your eye with your finger. Try to stay still and avoid blinking for one to two minutes after use. Make sure the dropper stays clean by not allowing it to touch any surfaces, including your eye. Wait fifteen minutes after using levobunolol before you put your contact lenses back in.

Levobunolol can cause you to have blurring of your vision. Use caution if you need to drive or do anything else that requires you to have clear vision.

Pregnant women should not take levobunolol unless it is definitely needed and the best possible treatment plan. It is not known if levobunolol is safe for use by pregnant women. If you are pregnant, talk to your doctor about the possible risks you may face, and he or she will help you to decide if it is the right choice for you to take levobunolol.

Make sure your doctor knows about all of your medical conditions before you start taking levobunolol. Tell your doctor about all the medicines that you take, and do not start taking a new medicine unless your doctor has told you that it is safe to do so.

There are a number of possible side effects that you may experience. If any of the side effects are causing you concern, or if they get worse over time, talk to your doctor about them. He or she may be able to tell you ways to prevent or reduce some of the side effects.

Condition Treated

  • Open-angle glaucoma
  • Ocular hypertension

Type Of Medicine

  • Beta-blocker

Side Effects

Any medication comes with the risk of creating unintended side effects in addition to the positive effect it is intended to produce. If you are ever concerned about any side effects that you are experiencing, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or a medical professional about them.

There are a number of different side effects that may be experienced by people taking levobunolol. It is unlikely that you will experience all of these side effects.

If you experience any of the following side effects, contact your doctor as soon as possible:

  • Blue skin, fingernails, or lips
  • Blurring of your vision
  • Change in your perception of color
  • Chest tightness
  • Chills
  • Coordination issues
  • Cough
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty or changes in breathing, or unusually shallow, fast, or slow breathing
  • Dilation of the neck veins
  • Double vision
  • Drainage or tearing from the eye
  • Eyelids drooping
  • Feeling confused
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Heart stops
  • Heartbeat is racing, rapid, or pounding
  • Hoarseness
  • Inability to speak
  • Irregular or slow heartbeat
  • Irritability
  • Itchy, prickly, burning, crawling, tingly, or numb sensations
  • Less urination
  • Lightheadedness, faintness, or dizziness when rising
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Loud breathing
  • Mouth sores, white spots, or ulcers
  • Muscle pain or weakness
  • Night blindness
  • No pulse or blood pressure
  • Pain in the eye
  • Pain or discomfort in your chest
  • Pain, swelling, or stiffness in the joints
  • Problems with talking, swallowing, or chewing
  • Seizures
  • Severe numbness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Slurring of speech
  • Skin lesions that appear red with a purple center
  • Skin rash, welts, hives, blistering, peeling, or looseness
  • Skin is itchy or red
  • Sore throat
  • Stinging, burning, swelling, itching, or redness in the eye
  • Sudden, severe weakness in leg or arm on one side of the body
  • Swollen face, feet, legs, hands, fingers, or lips
  • Temporary blindness
  • Tunnel vision
  • Unusual or severe fatigue
  • Visible halos around lights or lights appear overly bright
  • Walk is shaky or unsteady
  • Weight gain
  • Welts or hives
  • Wheezing

It is possible that you will experience some side effects that are normal and do not require you to seek any medical attention. Usually these side effects will decrease as your body adjusts to your use of the medication. If these side effects persist or get worse, talk to your doctor. He or she may be able to help you with ways to mitigate or prevent some of these side effects. You should also talk to your doctor if any of these side effects are causing you problems or if you have questions about them.

These side effects include:

  • Appetite loss
  • Congestion
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Fatigue
  • Feeling discouraged, sad, or empty, or losing interest or pleasure
  • Impotence
  • Irritability
  • Loss or lack of strength
  • Lowering of the libido
  • Nausea

You may also experience other side effects that have not been listed here. If you are experiencing any other side effects, talk to your doctor about them. You may also report any side effects that you have experienced to the FDA at 800-FDA-1080.

Dosage

Your dosage will be determined by your doctor and will depend on information individual to you, such as your particular medical condition and the strength of your medication.

A typical dose for an adult would be one or two drops of levobunolol in the eye one time per day. Your doctor may also decide to increase your dose to one to two drops twice each day.

Do not change the dosage that you are taking for any reason without first talking to your doctor about it.

Follow your doctor or pharmacist's instructions exactly when taking levobunolol. If you do not understand any of the instructions that you have been given, ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information before proceeding.

If you miss a dose, apply it as soon as you remember. If you are approaching the time when you normally apply your next dose, skip the forgotten dose and proceed with your normal dosing schedule. Do not double up on your dosage to make up for the missed dose.

Interactions

Some medications, when taken at the same time as other medications, can cause drug interactions. These interactions may reduce the effectiveness of one or both of the medications or may increase the risk or severity of side effects.

Tell your doctor or pharmacist about all the medications that you are taking, and do not begin taking new medications without checking with your doctor or pharmacist first. This includes prescription medications, over the counter medications, vitamins, or supplements.

The following medications are not recommended for use with levobunolol. However, taking them together may be necessary sometimes. Your doctor may change the way you take one or both of these medications to help you avoid interactions.

  • Dronedarone
  • Fenoldopam
  • Fingolimod
  • Oxymetazoline
  • Lacosamide
  • Diltiazem
  • Verapamil
  • Crizotinib
  • Epinephrine
  • Rivastigmine

Taking levobunolol with any of the following medications may increase the risk or severity of some side effects. However, your doctor might determine that it is still best for you to take both medications. He or she may alter the way you take one of the medications or change your dosage.

  • Bufexamac
  • Acarbose
  • Tiaprofenic Acid
  • Valdecoxib
  • Rosiglitazone
  • Tolfenamic Acid
  • Amiodarone
  • Doxazosin
  • Chlorpropamide
  • Moxisylyte
  • Ketorolac
  • Sodium Salicylate
  • Arbutamine
  • Salicylic Acid
  • Acemetacin
  • Morniflumate
  • Insulin Glulisine
  • Vildagliptin
  • Diflunisal
  • Mibefradil
  • Lornoxicam
  • Nateglinide
  • Choline Salicylate
  • Exenatide
  • Repaglinide
  • Dulaglutide
  • Tolazamide
  • Felbinac
  • Clonixin
  • Pioglitazone
  • Dapagliflozin
  • Bromfenac
  • Dexketoprofen
  • Oxyphenbutazone
  • Phentolamine
  • Tenoxicam
  • Tolmetin
  • Flufenamic Acid
  • Aceclofenac
  • Amtolmetin Guacil
  • Albiglutide
  • Droxicam
  • Urapidil
  • Lumiracoxib
  • Metformin
  • Miglitol
  • Glimepiride
  • Floctafenine
  • Insulin Human Regular
  • Rofecoxib
  • Nimesulide
  • Lixisenatide
  • Insulin Lispro, Recombinant
  • Terazosin
  • Glipizide
  • Salsalate
  • Ibuprofen
  • Celecoxib
  • Meloxicam
  • Meclofenamate
  • Indomethacin
  • Nimesulide Beta Cyclodextrin
  • Saxagliptin
  • Dexibuprofen
  • Linagliptin
  • Canagliflozin
  • Mefenamic Acid
  • Insulin Aspart, Recombinant
  • Etofenamate
  • Phenoxybenzamine
  • Piketoprofen
  • Nepafenac
  • Flurbiprofen
  • Propyphenazone
  • Feprazone
  • Phenylbutazone
  • Fepradinol
  • Niflumic Acid
  • Proglumetacin
  • Diclofenac
  • Insulin Human Isophane (NPH)
  • Loxoprofen
  • Glyburide
  • Sitagliptin
  • Insulin Detemir
  • Alogliptin
  • Fenoprofen
  • Tolbutamide
  • Aspirin
  • Sulindac
  • Proquazone
  • Insulin Degludec
  • St John's Wort
  • Insulin Human Inhaled
  • Parecoxib
  • Tamsulosin
  • Pramlintide
  • Nabumetone
  • Prazosin
  • Etodolac
  • Dipyrone
  • Alfuzosin
  • Liraglutide
  • Oxaprozin
  • Etoricoxib
  • Trimazosin
  • Piroxicam
  • Bunazosin
  • Empagliflozin
  • Ketoprofen
  • Pranoprofen
  • Naproxen
  • Insulin Glargine, Recombinant

Some foods may interact with certain medications. Your doctor or pharmacist will tell you if there are certain foods that you should avoid, or if you need to maintain a special diet of any kind while taking levobunolol.

Tobacco or alcohol may cause interactions with some medications. Make sure you talk to your doctor or pharmacist about your use of tobacco or alcohol. Your doctor or pharmacist will tell you if you need to alter your use of tobacco or alcohol in order to ensure the optimal functioning of levobunolol.

Warnings

Make sure that you tell your doctor about your complete medical history. Tell your doctor about any medical conditions that you have or have had. Other medical conditions may affect the way you need to take levobunolol. Make sure your doctor knows if you have any of the following medical conditions:

Some of these conditions may make it unsafe for you to take levobunolol. Others may mean that you need to use caution or be aware of certain symptoms. Your doctor will tell you about how your condition may change the way you need to take levobunolol.

Do not take levobunolol in any way except the way your doctor or pharmacist has instructed you to take it. If you do not understand how you are supposed to be taking levobunolol, talk to your doctor or medical professional before taking it.

Do not share your prescription with others.

Before you take levobunolol, make sure you have told your doctor about all of your allergies. It is possible that levobunolol may contain inactive ingredients that you are allergic to.

Levobunolol has not established to be safe for use by children. Children should not use levobunolol without serious consideration of the possible risks it may pose.

Levobunolol can cause blurring or changes to your vision. Do not drive, operate heavy machinery, or do tasks that require your full attention until you have learned how your body will react to levobunolol.

Levobunolol has not been established to be safe for use by pregnant women. If you are pregnant, talk to your doctor about the potential risks that you may face by taking levobunolol.

It is not known whether levobunolol is safe for use by breastfeeding women. It is possible that levobunolol may pass into your breastmilk. If you are breastfeeding, talk to your doctor about the risks of continuing to breastfeed while taking levobunolol. Your doctor may tell you to stop breastfeeding while you are taking levobunolol.

Storage

Keep your levobunolol stored in a closed container at room temperature. Keep it away from direct light, moisture, and heat. Do not allow it to freeze. Always keep medications out of the reach of children and pets.

Do not use expired medications. When disposing of expired or unused medications, do not flush them down the toilet, pour them in the sink, or throw them in the garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of unused medications safely and appropriately.

Summary

Ophthalmic levobunolol is a medication in the form of eye drops. This medication is used to reduce the pressure inside the eye to treat conditions such as long-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. If untreated, high ocular pressure can cause blindness.

It is important to talk to your doctor about any medications that you are taking before you begin using levobunolol. Do not start taking new medications while taking levobunolol unless you have cleared them with your doctor first. This includes prescription medications as well as over the counter medications, supplements, and vitamins. Some medications can interact with levobunolol in ways that can be detrimental to your health or affect the way levobunolol works in your body.

Talk to your doctor about any medical conditions that you have before you begin taking levobunolol. Your doctor will tell you if you need to alter the way you are taking levobunolol based upon your medical history.

Make sure you understand all of the instructions from your doctor about how to take levobunolol. If you do not understand these instructions, talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking levobunolol.

Do not stop taking levobunolol unless your doctor has told you to do so. Talk to your doctor before you stop taking levobunolol. Your high pressure eye condition may not have noticeable symptoms, but it may still be damaging to your eye. Levobunolol works best when it is taken regularly and consistently.

If you are having any signs of severe allergic reaction, stop using levobunolol and seek medical help right away.

Do not change your dosage or the way you are taking levobunolol unless you have talked to your doctor about it first. Take levobunolol exactly as your doctor has instructed.