Mesalamine (Oral)

Mesalamine is a medication that is used to help in the treatment and prevention of ulcerative colitis, which is an inflammatory bowel disease.

Overview

Mesalamine is a medication that is taken orally to aid in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease. Ulcerative colitis can be a severe condition that causes diarrhea, abdominal pain, and rectal bleeding.

Mesalamine works by reducing the inflammation in the colon which decreases the symptoms of the disease.

Mesalamine should always be swallowed whole, and not crushed, chewed, or broken. This enables it to be appropriately released into the colon, so it can work properly.

Mesalamine is not known to be safe for children under 5 years of age. Some brands of mesalamine may be safe for children 5 years of age and older. Talk to your doctor about the risks of using mesalamine for your children, whatever their age.

Make sure your doctor knows about all of your medical conditions before you start taking mesalamine. Tell our doctor about all of the medications that you are taking before you being taking mesalamine, and do not start taking new medications while you are on mesalamine without talking to your doctor about it first.

Tell your doctor about all of your allergies before you begin taking mesalamine. There may be inactive ingredients in the medication that you are allergic to.

There are a number of possible side effects that you may experience. Talk to your doctor if any of the side effects that you are experiencing are problematic or get worse over time. Your doctor might be able to help you to prevent or reduce some of the side effects.

Condition Treated

  • Ulcerative colitis

Type Of Medicine

  • Aminosalicylate

Side Effects

Any medication comes with the risk of creating unintended side effects in addition to the positive effect it is intended to produce. If you are worried about any of the side effects that you are experiencing, or if they are causing you problems, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

There are a number of different side effects that may be experienced by people taking mesalamine. It is unlikely that you will experience all of these side effects.

If you experience any of the following side effects, contact your doctor as soon as possible:

  • Anxiety
  • Blurring of the vision
  • Chills
  • Dizziness
  • Feeling nervous
  • Fever
  • Itching and rash
  • Nausea
  • Pain in the chest or moving from the chest to neck, left shoulder, or left arm
  • Pale or bluish skin
  • Pressure in the stomach
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Sensation of being bloated or full
  • Sensation of pounding in the ears
  • Severe back pain
  • Severe headache
  • Severe stomach or abdominal cramping
  • Slow heartbeat
  • Stomach or abdominal swelling
  • Unusual fatigue
  • Vomiting
  • Yellow color to skin or eyes

It is possible that you will experience some side effects that are normal and do not require you to seek any medical attention. Usually these side effects will decrease as your body adjusts to your use of the medication. If these side effects persist or get worse, talk to your doctor. He or she may be able to help you with ways to mitigate or prevent some of these side effects. You should also talk to your doctor if any of these side effects are causing you problems or if you have questions about them.

These side effects include:

  • Acne
  • Appetite loss
  • Belching
  • Flatulence
  • Gas in the intestines or stomach
  • Heartburn
  • Indigestion
  • Mild diarrhea
  • Mild headache
  • Mild stomach or abdominal pain or cramping
  • Nasal congestion or runniness
  • Pain in the back or joints
  • Pain or stiffness in the muscles
  • Sneezing
  • Sour stomach
  • Thinning of the hair or hair loss
  • Trouble moving
  • Upset stomach

You may also experience other side effects that have not been listed here. If you are experiencing any other side effects, make sure you talk to your doctor about it. You may also report any side effects that you have experienced to the FDA at 800-FDA-1080.

Dosage

Your dosage will be determined by your doctor and will depend on information individual to you, such as your weight, the severity of your condition, and the strength of your medication. It will also be dependent on whether you are taking mesalamine to manage your existing symptoms or prevent future outbreaks of ulcerative colitis.

Mesalamine should be taken by mouth as instructed by your doctor. Typically, it is taken four times per day. The tablet form of mesalamine should be taken with food. The capsule form can be taken with or without food.

You should swallow mesalamine whole, and not chew it, break it, or crush it. Taking it inappropriately can impact how mesalamine is released in the body and can be detrimental to its proper function. If you are unable to swallow your capsule whole, you may open it and stir the contents into yogurt or applesauce. Make sure you swallow the applesauce or yogurt and medication without chewing it, and as soon as you have mixed it.

Do not change the dosage that your doctor has prescribed you for any reason unless you are instructed to do so.

Follow your doctor or pharmacist's instructions exactly when taking mesalamine. If you do not understand any of the instructions that you have been given, ask your doctor or pharmacist for help before you take mesalamine.

Mesalamine will work best if it is taken regularly. Try to take it at the same time every day.

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If you are approaching the time when you normally take your next dose, skip the forgotten dose and proceed with your normal dosing schedule. Do not double up on your dosage to make up for the missed dose.

Interactions

Some medications, when taken at the same time as other medications, can cause drug interactions. These interactions may reduce the effectiveness of one or both of the medications or may increase the risk or severity of side effects.

Make sure your doctor knows all the medications that you are taking. Do not begin taking new medications while you are on mesalamine, including prescription medications, over the counter medications, vitamins, or supplements.

The following medications are not recommended for use with mesalamine. However, taking them together may be necessary sometimes. Your doctor may change the way you take one or both of these medications to help you avoid interactions.

  • Fepradinol
  • Nimesulide
  • Fenoprofen
  • Proglumetacin
  • Indomethacin
  • Piketoprofen
  • Tiaprofenic Acid
  • Naproxen
  • Loxoprofen
  • Celecoxib
  • Ibuprofen
  • Meloxicam
  • Tolfenamic Acid
  • Mefenamic Acid
  • Meclofenamate
  • Oxaprozin
  • Etofenamate
  • Morniflumate
  • Piroxicam
  • Mercaptopurine
  • Proquazone
  • Floctafenine
  • Aceclofenac
  • Tolmetin
  • Flufenamic Acid
  • Varicella Virus Vaccine
  • Etoricoxib
  • Lumiracoxib
  • Niflumic Acid
  • Felbinac
  • Nepafenac
  • Flurbiprofen
  • Dipyrone
  • Droxicam
  • Lornoxicam
  • Feprazone
  • Valdecoxib
  • Rofecoxib
  • Dexketoprofen
  • Oxyphenbutazone
  • Nimesulide Beta Cyclodextrin
  • Diclofenac
  • Bromfenac
  • Etodolac
  • Bufexamac
  • Propyphenazone
  • Tenoxicam
  • Ketoprofen
  • Amtolmetin Guacil
  • Sulindac
  • Clonixin
  • Dexibuprofen
  • Phenylbutazone
  • Parecoxib
  • Acemetacin
  • Nabumetone

Taking mesalamine with any of the following medications may increase the risk or severity of some side effects. Your doctor may decide to have you take both medications despite this risk. Your doctor will determine if the benefit you will receive outweighs the risk. To counter this, he or she may change your dosage or the way you take one or both of the medications.

  • Tamarind
  • Warfarin

Some foods may interact with certain medications. Your doctor or pharmacist will tell you if there are certain foods that you should avoid, or if you need to maintain a special diet of any kind while taking mesalamine.

Some medications may interact negatively with tobacco or alcohol. Discuss your use of tobacco and alcohol with your doctor or pharmacist. Your doctor or pharmacist will tell you if you need to alter your use of tobacco or alcohol in order to ensure the optimal functioning of mesalamine.

Warnings

Make sure that you talk to your doctor about your medical history. Your doctor needs to know about any medical conditions that you have. Other medical conditions may affect the way you need to take mesalamine. Make sure your doctor knows if you have any of the following medical conditions:

  • Kidney disease'the effects of mesalamine may be increased because it is leaving your body more slowly
  • Liver disease'condition may be exacerbated by mesalamine
  • Phenylketonuria'some mesalamine capsules may contain aspartame, which may cause problems for people with this condition
  • Sulfasalazine allergy'side effects may be more severe

Some of these conditions may make it unsafe for you to take mesalamine. Others may mean that you need to use caution or be aware of certain symptoms. Your doctor will tell you about how your condition may change the way you need to take mesalamine.

Do not take mesalamine in any way except the way you have been instructed to do so. If you do not understand how you are supposed to be taking mesalamine, talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking it.

Do not share your prescription with others.

Your doctor should check your progress regularly while you are taking mesalamine. He or she should use these progress checks to determine if mesalamine is working properly, if you should continue to take it or not, and if you are having any undesirable effects from it.

If you experience stomach pain, abdominal pain, headache, rash, fever, cramping, or bloody diarrhea while you are taking mesalamine, talk to your doctor about it as soon as possible. These are symptoms of a medical condition known as mesalamine-induced acute intolerance syndrome.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of a severe allergic reaction, talk to your doctor or seek medical help right away. These symptoms include rapid heartbeat, skin rash, itching, or redness, swollen tongue, throat, or face, or trouble swallowing or breathing.

If you experience appetite loss, nausea or vomiting, yellowness of your skin or eyes, tenderness or pain in your upper stomach area, dark urine, or unusually pale stools, these could be signs of a serious liver issue. Talk to your doctor as soon as possible.

With some forms of mesalamine, you should not take antacids. Ask your doctor if this applies to the form of mesalamine that you are taking.

Before you take mesalamine, make sure you have told your doctor about all of your allergies. It is possible that mesalamine may contain inactive ingredients that you are allergic to.

Mesalamine has not been established to be safe for use by children under five. Some forms of mesalamine have been tested for safety in children five years of age and older. Children under five years old should not use mesalamine without thoughtful consideration of the possible risks it may pose. Children five years of age and older may take some forms of mesalamine. Make sure you talk to your child's doctor about the risks and benefits in order to make the right decision for your child's health.

It is not known whether mesalamine is safe for use by breastfeeding women. It is possible that mesalamine may pass into your breastmilk. If you are breastfeeding, talk to your doctor about the risks of continuing to breastfeed while taking mesalamine. Your doctor may tell you to stop breastfeeding while you are taking mesalamine.

Make sure that you take mesalamine the way your doctor or pharmacist instructed you to. Do not change your dose without talking to your doctor first. Do not double your dose. Talk to your doctor before you decide to stop taking mesalamine. Keep taking mesalamine even if your symptoms begin to clear up.

Storage

Keep your mesalamine stored in a closed container at room temperature. Keep it away from direct light, moisture, and heat. Do not allow it to freeze. Always keep medications out of the reach of children and pets.

Do not use expired medications. When disposing of expired or unused medications, do not flush them down the toilet, pour them in the sink, or throw them in the garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of unused medications safely and appropriately.

Summary

Mesalamine is a medication taken orally to treat ulcerative colitis. Ulcerative is an inflammatory bowel disease with symptoms that include bloody stools, stomach pain and cramping, and diarrhea. Mesalamine helps to reduce these symptoms by reducing the swelling in the colon. It can also help to prevent future outbreaks of ulcerative colitis by reducing the inflammation in the colon.

It is important to talk to your doctor about any medications that you are taking before you begin using mesalamine. Do not start taking new medications while taking mesalamine unless you have cleared them with your doctor first. This includes prescription medications as well as over the counter medications, supplements, and vitamins. Some medications can interact with mesalamine in ways that can be detrimental to your health or affect the way mesalamine works in your body.

Talk to your doctor about any medical conditions that you have before you begin taking mesalamine. Your doctor will tell you if you need to alter the way you are taking mesalamine based upon your medical history.

Make sure you understand all of the instructions from your doctor about how to take mesalamine. If you do not understand these instructions, talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking mesalamine.

Do not stop taking mesalamine unless your doctor has told you to do so. Talk to your doctor before you stop taking mesalamine. Your condition may seem like it is improving, but you should still continue to take mesalamine until your doctor instructs you to stop.

If you are having any signs of severe allergic reaction, stop using mesalamine and seek medical help right away.

Do not change your dosage or the way you are taking mesalamine unless you have talked to your doctor about it first. Take mesalamine exactly as your doctor has instructed.