Methocarbamol (Injection)

In certain cases where a patient is suffering from the temporary pain and discomfort that can be caused by some muscle and bone conditions have reported relief after receiving a prescription dosage of methocarbamol injection; this medication is also used to treat tetanus.

Overview

Patients who are afflicted with acute, short-term bone and muscle conditions that cause a significant level of pain and discomfort have found relief after receiving a methocarbamol injection. This prescription medication is administered by a nurse or other medical professional in a hospital or other clinic-like setting, with the injection going into either the muscle or vein.

This medication should not be used in any capacity by patients who are afflicted with Myasthenia gravis. Prior to receiving any treatment or medication for your bone and muscle pain or tetanus inform your doctor of your comprehensive medical history and inform them of all medications that you are taking. Again, patients who are afflicted with Myasthenia gravis should not take the methocarbamol injection.

Patients are reminded to include all medications when reporting such to their physician or another member of their medical team. This includes all prescription and non-prescription drugs as well as any herbal remedies that are utilized, along with all vitamin and mineral supplements.

This medication is used for a very short period of time, with likely less than five doses administered, until the patient's improvement shows significant improvement. After this initial period of receiving the methocarbamol via injection, the physician will transition the patient to an oral version of methocarbamol to enable the patient to self-administer this medication at home.

Because this medication can cause overdose, patients, and their caregivers are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the signs and symptoms of a methocarbamol injection overdose. Due to the fact that this drug is given by a healthcare professional in a hospital or other clinic-like setting, it is advisable for the patient to remain there until they are certain that they are feeling alright and not experiencing any serious effects from the injection.

The methocarbamol injection is only available with a prescription and comes in the following one dosage delivery method:

  • Solution

Conditions Treated

  • Tetanus
  • Painful bone and muscle conditions

Type of Medicine

Muscle Relaxant

Side Effects

Similar to most other prescription medications, the methocarbamol injection can cause certain reactions in addition to the desired outcomes. Patients and their caregivers are advised to familiarize themselves with the possible unwanted side effects and understand what action should be taken in the event that they occur. Patients should also inform their doctor and medical team of all of the medications that they are currently taking and any that they have recently stopped taking as they can have an effect on the way that the patient's system will react to the methocarbamol injection.

While some symptoms do require further medical attention, there are others but will likely dissipate on their own. If there is ever any confusion as to whether symptoms require further attention, it is always best to err on the side of caution.

In the event that any of the symptoms or side effects that are listed below occur it is important to notify your physician as they may be a sign of a more serious problem:

An unknown incidence of occurrence:

  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • Vomiting of blood
  • Blurred vision
  • Unusual bleeding or bruising
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Tightness in the chest
  • Clay-colored stools
  • Sweating
  • Convulsions
  • Sores, ulcers, or white spots on lips or in the patient's mouth
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Slow or irregular heartbeat
  • Drowsiness
  • Skin rash
  • Fever
  • Relaxed and calm
  • Itching
  • Problems with memory
  • Lightheadedness
  • Dizziness
  • Fainting
  • Nausea
  • Loss of bladder control
  • Yellow eyes or skin
  • Loss of memory
  • Painful or difficult urination
  • Loss of appetite
  • Puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes
  • Large, hive-like swelling on face
  • Shortness of breath
  • Hives
  • Sleepiness
  • Fast heartbeat
  • A sore throat
  • Dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness
  • Sudden loss of consciousness
  • Dark urine
  • Swollen glands
  • Confusion
  • Unpleasant breath odor
  • Chills
  • Unusual tiredness or weakness
  • Changes in skin color, pain, tenderness, in the feet or legs
  • Wheezing
  • Black, tarry stools
  • Muscle spasm or jerking of all extremities

Seek immediate emergency help should the following symptoms of overdose occur:

  • Loss of consciousness

  • Change in consciousness

Because the methocarbamol injection is administered by a nurse or another medical professional in the hospital or another clinic-like setting, it is advisable for the patient to remain at the facility until any negative reaction that they have experienced from the injection have passed.

The side effects that are listed below typically occur as the patient's system adjusts to the introduction of the methocarbamol injection. Patients may experience such symptoms just after the administration of the injection or several hours afterwards. Most likely, these effects will dissipate on their own without any further medical attention. Should they last longer than a few days, or become worse, it may be a sign of a more serious issue and your doctor should be informed:

An unknown incidence of occurrence:

  • Acid or sour stomach
  • Inability to sleep
  • Any rash, burning or bleeding, or other skin reaction at the site of the injection
  • A stuffy nose
  • Discharge, or any excessive tearing
  • The sensation of spinning
  • Feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings
  • Redness, pain, or swelling of eye
  • Heartburn
  • Vomiting
  • Metallic taste
  • Redness of the face, neck, or upper torso
  • Indigestion
  • Seeing double
  • Feeling overly warm
  • Sleeplessness
  • Double vision
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Burning, dry, or itching eyes
  • Uncontrolled eye movements
  • Belching

While this list aims to be comprehensive, it is possible that patients may experience certain side effects that are not listed here. If such symptoms become significant in nature or become a cause for concern, notify your doctor for further medical advice.

Dosage

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this medicine. This medicine is given as a shot into a muscle or into a vein.

Major Drug Interactions:

There are certain medications that are contraindicated for use with the methocarbamol injection. Prior to beginning your course of treatment make sure that your doctor and the entire medical team are aware of all medications that you are currently taking or have stopped taking recently. If you are taking a drug that has been reported to not interact well with methocarbamol injection your doctor may change the way that you take one or both of the medications.

The following list of drugs are not considered to be ideal for taking concurrently with methocarbamol injection and there may be an increase in the likelihood of side effects occurring. If you are currently taking one of these drugs your doctor may change the way in which you take it prior to administering the methocarbamol injection.

  • Alfentanil
  • Tramadol
  • Amobarbital
  • Temazepam
  • Aprobarbital
  • Sufentanil
  • Buprenorphine
  • Secobarbital
  • Butalbital
  • Quazepam
  • Carisoprodol
  • Primidone
  • Chlordiazepoxide
  • Phenobarbital
  • Clobazam
  • Pentobarbital
  • Clorazepate
  • Oxymorphone
  • Dantrolene
  • Oxazepam
  • Dihydrocodeine
  • Morphine Sulfate Liposome
  • Estazolam
  • Midazolam
  • Fentanyl
  • Methocarbamol
  • Flunitrazepam
  • Metaxalone
  • Halazepam
  • Mephobarbital
  • Hydromorphone
  • Meperidine
  • Levorphanol
  • Zolpidem
  • Medazepam
  • Lorazepam
  • Mephenesin
  • Ketazolam
  • Meprobamate
  • Hydrocodone
  • Methadone
  • Flurazepam
  • Methohexital
  • Flibanserin
  • Morphine
  • Ethchlorvynol
  • Nitrazepam
  • Doxylamine
  • Oxycodone
  • Diazepam
  • Pentazocine
  • Codeine
  • Periciazine
  • Clonazepam
  • Prazepam
  • Chlorzoxazone
  • Propoxyphene
  • Chloral Hydrate
  • Remifentanil
  • Butorphanol
  • Sodium Oxybate
  • Butabarbital
  • Tapentadol
  • Bromazepam
  • Thiopental
  • Anileridine
  • Triazolam
  • Alprazolam
  • Lormetazepam

Inform your doctor of any lifestyle habits that you have, such as the use of alcohol and tobacco products, as these substances can affect the way that your body reacts to the methocarbamol injection.

Let your medical team know of any allergies from which you suffer. Include information about any medications to which you are allergic as well as all foods, animals, cleaning products, and other substances.

Patients who are afflicted with Myasthenia gravis should not take the methocarbamol injection under any circumstances. Patients who are afflicted with the other medical conditions that are listed here should be aware that the methocarbamol injection may cause their conditions to worsen or become more complicated:

Warnings

This medication should not be used in any capacity by patients who are afflicted with Myasthenia gravis. Prior to receiving any treatment or medication for your bone and muscle pain or tetanus inform your doctor of your comprehensive medical history and inform them of all medications that you are taking. Again, patients who are afflicted with Myasthenia gravis should not take the methocarbamol injection.

This medication is used on a temporary basis, typically with a course of treatment that lasts less than 5 doses until there is an improvement of the condition; at this point, the patient is then transitioned to an oral medication that they can self-administer.

Storage

Because methocarbamol injection is administered by a medical professional in a clinic-like setting, there is no need to worry about storage procedures. This medication is never self-administered or taken at the home of the patient unless administered by a medical professional.

Summary

Patients who are afflicted with acute, short-term bone and muscle conditions that cause a significant level of pain and discomfort have found relief after receiving a methocarbamol injection. This prescription medication is administered by a nurse or other medical professional in a hospital or other clinic-like setting, with the injection going into either the muscle or vein.

This medication should not be used in any capacity by patients who are afflicted with Myasthenia gravis. Prior to receiving any treatment or medication for your bone and muscle pain or tetanus inform your doctor of your comprehensive medical history and inform them of all medications that you are taking. Again, patients who are afflicted with Myasthenia gravis should not take the methocarbamol injection.

Patients are reminded to include all medications when reporting such to their physician or another member of their medical team. This includes all prescription and non-prescription drugs as well as any herbal remedies that are utilized, along with all vitamin and mineral supplements.

It is possible to overdose on methocarbamol injection and patients and their caregivers should become familiar with the signs and symptoms of overdose. Because this medication is administered in a hospital or other clinic-like setting patients should wait until they are sure that they feel alright, without any dizziness or lightheadedness, before they leave.