Metoprolol (Oral)

Metoprolol is an antihypertensive medication which is taken orally to treat high blood pressure and angina.

Overview

Metoprolol is a medication that is taken orally to lower blood pressure in patients who suffer from high blood pressure, or hypertension. It can be taken by itself or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. It is the type of medication known as a beta-blocker.

When people have high blood pressure for an extended period of time, it can cause physical damage to the blood vessels throughout the body, including those in the brain, heart, or kidneys. This happens when the heart and blood vessels stop functioning correctly. The damage caused by long-term high blood pressure can increase a patient's risk of kidney failure, heart failure, and stroke.

High blood pressure is a common problem in the United States that increases the occurrence of dangerous cardiovascular events like heart attacks. It is important to treat hypertension by reducing blood pressure in order to reduce the risks of heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure by halting the damage to the blood vessels.

Metoprolol lowers high blood pressure by causing the heart to beat more slowly. This results in the blood pressure lowering, which allows more oxygen and blood to remain in the heart.

Metoprolol is also used to treat angina, or severe chest pain. It is also used in patients who have had a heart attack to reduce their risk of having more heart attacks. It is also prescribed to patients with heart failure.

Metoprolol is only available with a prescription from your doctor.

Metoprolol has not been proven to be safe for use by pregnant women. It should only be taken if it is clearly needed. If you are pregnant, discuss with your doctor the risks you may face by taking metoprolol and make the decision with your doctor.

Tell your doctor about all the medications that you are taking, including over the counter medications, vitamins, and supplements, before you begin taking metoprolol. Do not begin taking new medications without talking to your doctor or pharmacist about it first. Metoprolol can interact with certain medications in ways that can affect the way one or both of the medications works.

If you have some other medical problems, it could affect the way you are able to use metoprolol. Make sure you tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions. Some medical conditions mean that you should not be using metoprolol at all.

Make sure you understand all of the instructions you received about how to take metoprolol. If you do not understand any of these instructions, ask your doctor or pharmacist before taking metoprolol. Do not take metoprolol in any way other than how you have been instructed to take it. Do not change your dosage without your doctor's instructions. Talk to your doctor before you stop taking metoprolol.

Metoprolol will not cure your high blood pressure. It is likely that your blood pressure will increase again when you stop taking metoprolol. Some patients need to take metoprolol for the rest of their lives in order to keep blood pressure at a healthy level and prevent serious issues.

Condition Treated

  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Chest pain (angina)
  • Heart failure

Type Of Medicine

  • Beta-blocker

Side Effects

All medications have a risk of causing negative side effects. If you are uncomfortable with any of the side effects that you are experiencing, or have any questions about them, talk to your doctor or medical professional about them. Your doctor may be able to give you ways to mitigate or prevent some of the side effects that you are experiencing.

If you experience any of the following side effects, tell your doctor about them immediately:

  • Appetite loss that does not go away
  • Bad breath odor
  • Bleeding gums
  • Bleeding or bruising more than normal
  • Blurring of your vision
  • Changes in your perception of color
  • Chest tightness
  • Chills
  • Clammy skin
  • Cough
  • Dark colored urine
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Dilation of your neck veins
  • Double vision
  • Feeling faint, lightheaded, or dizzy when rising
  • Feeling confused
  • Feelings of pins and needles, tingling, crawling, itching, burning, or numbness
  • Fever
  • Fingers or toes appear bluish in color
  • Fingers or toes feel numb
  • Frozen facial muscles, arms, or legs
  • Gaining weight rapidly
  • General fatigue
  • Headache
  • Hoarseness
  • Inability to speak
  • Irregular breathing
  • Lips or mouth have white spots, ulcers, or sores
  • Lowered urination
  • Loss of short-term memories
  • More frequent need to urinate
  • Night blindness
  • Pain in side or lower back
  • Pain in the stomach or upper abdomen
  • Pain or discomfort in your chest
  • Pain or stiffness in muscles
  • Pain or tingling in toes or fingers when they are in the cold
  • Pain, weakness, or muscle tension when you walk that recedes after resting
  • Presence of blood in stool or urine
  • Rapid, racing, or pounding heartbeat
  • Rapid, racing, or pounding pulse
  • Rash
  • Red spots on skin
  • Seeing halos around lights or lights appear overly bright
  • Sensation of hearing, feeling, or seeing things that do not exist
  • Severe or persistent nausea and vomiting
  • Severe or persistent stomach or abdominal pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Skin itch
  • Skin or eyes appear yellowish
  • Slowed speech
  • Sore throat
  • Stools are clay-colored, light-colored, or tarry black
  • Swollen, painful, or red joints
  • Swollen or bloated feet, legs, arms, hands, face, or fingers
  • Tingling sensation in the feet or hands
  • Toes or fingertips feel cold and/or appear pale
  • Trouble breathing
  • Trouble moving
  • Trouble speaking
  • Tunnel vision
  • Unusually loud breathing
  • Unusual or severe fatigue
  • Unusual sweating
  • Unusual weight fluctuations
  • Vision loss
  • Vomiting blood
  • Weakness

Some side effects can be indicators of an overdose, which is dangerous and requires immediate medical attention. If you have any of the side effects listed below, stop taking metoprolol and get medical help right away.

  • Bluish tint to your lips, palms, nail beds/fingernails, or skin
  • Change of or loss in consciousness
  • Extreme sleepiness or drowsiness
  • Heart stops
  • Lack of pulse or blood pressure
  • Unconsciousness

You may also experience some of the side effects, listed below, that are considered normal and do not require medical attention. Side effects should lessen as your body gets used to the new medications. If your side effects continue after taking metoprolol consistently, or if they get worse, talk to your doctor.

  • Belching or flatulence
  • Bloating
  • Bone pain
  • Changes in taste or aftertaste
  • Chest pain underneath your breastbone
  • Constipation or difficulty passing stool
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Dry eyes
  • Dry mouth
  • Fatigue
  • Fear
  • Feeling discouraged, empty, or sad
  • Feeling full
  • Feeling like you or your surroundings are moving constantly
  • Feeling nervous
  • Gas in intestines or stomach
  • Hives
  • Impotence
  • Increased skin sensitivity to sunlight or increased sunburn
  • Indigestion
  • Irritability
  • Lack of pleasure or interest
  • Loss of hearing
  • Loss of interest in sexual activity
  • Loss or thinning of the hair
  • Low libido or sexual ability or performance
  • Nightmares
  • Penis pain during erections
  • Persistent noises in your ears, such as buzzing or ringing
  • Runny or congested nose
  • Skin discoloration
  • Sneezing
  • Spinning sensation
  • Welts

It is also possible that you may experience other side effects that have not been listed here. If you experience any side effects that have not been listed, talk to your doctor to make sure they are not signs of any issues with your treatment or high blood pressure. You should also check in with your doctor if any of the side effects that you are experiencing are severe or are causing you problems.

You may also report any side effects that you experience to the FDA at 800-FDA-1080.

Dosage

Your doctor will prescribe you an individual dosage based upon factors like your weight, your medical history, the condition you are taking it for, and the severity of your condition. Do not change your dosage for any reason unless your doctor has instructed you to do so. Increasing your dose will not increase the positive effects of the medication.

A typical dose of extended-release tablets for heart attack or heart failure is:

  • Adults: 25 milligrams per day for the first two weeks. May be adjusted by your doctor if it is needed to improve function.

A typical dose of tablets for heart attack or heart failure is:

  • Adults: 50 milligrams every 6 hours for the first 2 days. After that, 100 milligrams taken twice per day.

A typical dose of extended-release tablets for chest pain is:

  • Adults: 100 milligrams taken once per day. May be adjusted by your doctor if it is needed to improve function. The dosage will generally not exceed 400 milligrams per day.

A typical dose of tablets for chest pain is:

  • Adults: 100 milligrams taken twice per day, 50 milligrams each time. May be adjusted by your doctor if it is needed to improve function. The dosage will generally not exceed 400 milligrams per day.

A typical dose of extended-release tablets for high blood pressure is:

  • Adults: 25 to 100 milligrams per day initially. May be adjusted by your doctor if it is needed to improve function. The dosage will generally not exceed 400 milligrams per day.
  • Children ages 6 and older: 1 milligram per kilogram of body weight taken once per day. Initial dose should not exceed 50 milligrams per day.

A typical dose of tablets for high blood pressure is:

  • Adults: 100 milligrams per day initially, taken once or in multiple doses. May be adjusted by your doctor if it is needed to improve function. The dosage will generally not exceed 450 milligrams per day.

You should take your dose at roughly the same time(s) each day. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If you are close to the time you take your next dose, skip the forgotten dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose.

If you think you might be having an overdose, seek emergency medical help or call your local poison control center immediately.

Interactions

Many medications can interact with other medications in ways that can make the medications less effective or increase the severity of side effects. Make sure you tell your doctor or pharmacist about any medications you are taking before you begin taking metoprolol. Do not start taking any new medications while you are taking metoprolol without talking to your doctor about it first.

Taking metoprolol with any of the following medications is usually not recommended. Your doctor may decide that you need to take both medications. He or she may change the dosage or the way you take one or both of the medications to minimize any interactions that might occur.

  • Fenoldopam
  • Lacosamide
  • Clonidine
  • Diltiazem
  • Fingolimod
  • Panobinostat
  • Dronedarone
  • Crizotinib
  • Lidocaine
  • Verapamil
  • Terbinafine
  • Rivastigmine

Taking metoprolol with any of the medications listed below could increase the risk or severity of some side effects. Your doctor might decide that it is best for you to take both medications anyway, but may change your dosage or the way you take one or both of the medications in order to minimize interactions.

  • Ketoprofen
  • Rofecoxib
  • Phentolamine
  • Terazosin
  • Mirabegron
  • Bromfenac
  • Amtolmetin Guacil
  • Phenelzine
  • Insulin Human Regular
  • Ibuprofen
  • Glipizide
  • Insulin Human Inhaled
  • Insulin Human Isophane (NPH)
  • Pranoprofen
  • Fenoprofen
  • Morniflumate
  • Urapidil
  • Metformin
  • Insulin Lispro, Recombinant
  • Bunazosin
  • Lumiracoxib
  • Etofenamate
  • Insulin Glargine, Recombinant
  • Prazosin
  • Flufenamic Acid
  • Mefenamic Acid
  • Nimesulide Beta Cyclodextrin
  • Proglumetacin
  • Mibefradil
  • Metildigoxin
  • Dexketoprofen
  • St John's Wort
  • Etoricoxib
  • Diclofenac
  • Dapagliflozin
  • Insulin Degludec
  • Acemetacin
  • Trimazosin
  • Tolmetin
  • Linagliptin
  • Piketoprofen
  • Choline Salicylate
  • Sodium Salicylate
  • Citalopram
  • Phenobarbital
  • Glyburide
  • Floctafenine
  • Loxoprofen
  • Rifapentine
  • Tiaprofenic Acid
  • Tamsulosin
  • Propyphenazone
  • Exenatide
  • Sitagliptin
  • Venlafaxine
  • Tolbutamide
  • Tolfenamic Acid
  • Rifampin
  • Celecoxib
  • Phenylbutazone
  • Saxagliptin
  • Insulin Detemir
  • Insulin Glulisine
  • Amiodarone
  • Repaglinide
  • Glimepiride
  • Oxyphenbutazone
  • Acetyldigoxin
  • Deslanoside
  • Liraglutide
  • Arbutamine
  • Felbinac
  • Moxisylyte
  • Alogliptin
  • Nateglinide
  • Miglitol
  • Ketorolac
  • Albiglutide
  • Pioglitazone
  • Aceclofenac
  • Phenoxybenzamine
  • Propoxyphene
  • Nepafenac
  • Canagliflozin
  • Insulin Aspart, Recombinant
  • Naproxen
  • Telithromycin
  • Flurbiprofen
  • Piroxicam
  • Dulaglutide
  • Vildagliptin
  • Pramlintide
  • Nimesulide
  • Oxaprozin
  • Tenoxicam
  • Sulindac
  • Dexibuprofen
  • Empagliflozin
  • Salicylic Acid
  • Doxazosin
  • Fepradinol
  • Aspirin
  • Meclofenamate
  • Diflunisal
  • Etodolac
  • Tolazamide
  • Nabumetone
  • Acarbose
  • Valdecoxib
  • Alfuzosin
  • Droxicam
  • Chlorpropamide
  • Lixisenatide
  • Feprazone
  • Meloxicam
  • Salsalate
  • Niflumic Acid
  • Parecoxib
  • Digoxin
  • Clonixin
  • Digitoxin
  • Indomethacin
  • Rosiglitazone
  • Proquazone
  • Dipyrone
  • Bufexamac
  • Lornoxicam

Some foods may interact with certain medications. Your doctor or pharmacist will tell you if there are certain foods that you should avoid, or if you need to maintain a special diet of any kind while taking metoprolol. If you have any questions about what you should eat while taking metoprolol, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Some medications may interact with alcohol or tobacco. If you use alcohol or tobacco, talk to your doctor about your usage. Your doctor or pharmacist will tell you if you need to alter your use of tobacco or alcohol in order to ensure the optimal functioning of metoprolol.

Warnings

Do not stop taking metoprolol unless your doctor has instructed you to do so. Ceasing metoprolol abruptly may cause some conditions to become worse. Your doctor may want to reduce your dosage slowly before you stop taking metoprolol altogether.

Many medications can interact with other medications in ways that can limit their effectiveness or increase the risk of side effects. Make sure you talk to your doctor or pharmacist about any medications you are taking to make sure they won't have negative interactions. Do not start taking any new medications while you are taking metoprolol without talking to your doctor about it first.

Make sure that you talk to your doctor about your medical history. Talk to your doctor about any medical conditions that you have or that you have had in the past. Other medical conditions may affect the way your body reacts to metoprolol. Taking metoprolol if you have certain conditions may exacerbate them and endanger your health. If you have any of the following medical conditions, it is especially important that you tell your doctor about them.

  • Angina metoprolol may exacerbate this condition
  • Blood circulation issues (severe) you should not use metoprolol if you have this condition
  • Bradycardia you should not use metoprolol if you have this condition
  • Clogged blood vessels (peripheral vascular disorders) you should not use metoprolol if you have this condition
  • Diabetes metoprolol may conceal some symptoms of this condition
  • Heart block you should not use metoprolol if you have this condition
  • Heart failure (severe) you should not use metoprolol if you have this condition
  • Hyperthyroidism metoprolol may conceal some symptoms of this condition
  • Hypoglycemia metoprolol may conceal some symptoms of this condition
  • Ischemic heart disease metoprolol may exacerbate this condition
  • Liver disease the effects of metoprolol may be increased as your body will remove it more slowly
  • Low blood pressure (hypotension) metoprolol may exacerbate this condition
  • Lung disease, such as bronchitis, emphysema, or asthma metoprolol may exacerbate this condition
  • Pheochromocytoma metoprolol may exacerbate this condition
  • Sick-sinus syndrome you should not use metoprolol if you have this condition

Metoprolol can cause some symptoms of heart failure to become worse. Talk to your doctor as soon as possible if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms: dilation of your neck veins, pain or discomfort in your chest, severe fatigue, irregularity of your breathing, irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath or wheezing, weight gain, or swollen fingers, feet, legs, or face.

Metoprolol can cause your blood sugar levels to shift. It may also conceal some of the signs of low blood sugar, such as fast pulse. If you notice changes in your diabetes symptoms or changes in the results of your blood sugar tests, talk to your doctor about it.

If you are having surgery, make sure the doctor performing it knows you are taking metoprolol. It may be necessary for you to stop taking it before your surgery.

Metoprolol may cause some people to feel less alert. Make sure you do not drive, operate heavy machinery, or do any tasks that require alertness before you know how metoprolol will affect you.

Metoprolol may cause some people to feel extremely dizzy or lightheaded when rising. Some people may even faint. You can mitigate this issue by rising slowly, or help reduce the feeling by lying down for a while.

Do not take metoprolol in any way except the way your doctor or pharmacist has instructed you to take it. If you do not understand how you are supposed to be taking metoprolol, ask your doctor or medical professional for clarification before you start taking it. Do not share your prescription with others.

Before you take metoprolol, make sure you have told your doctor about all of your allergies. It is possible that metoprolol may contain inactive ingredients that you are allergic to.

Metoprolol has not been determined to be safe for pregnant women, and should only be used by pregnant women when clearly needed. If you are pregnant, talk to your doctor about the risks that metoprolol may present. Your doctor should help you determine if taking metoprolol is the right decision for you.

Metoprolol tablets have not determined to be safe for children of any age. Metoprolol extended-release tablets have not been determined to be safe for children of less than 6 years of age. Make sure you talk to your doctor about the risks of metoprolol before giving it to your child.

Metoprolol is considered to be safe for use by geriatric patients, although they are more likely to have problems with their livers, hearts, or kidneys. These problems may require an adjustment of the dosage or extra caution when taking metoprolol.

Storage

Metoprolol should always be stored in a tightly sealed container, and kept at room temperature. Do not expose metoprolol to direct light, heat, or moisture, and do not allow it to freeze.

Keep all medications out of the reach of children and animals.

Do not used expired medications. Do not dispose of medications by flushing them down the toilet, pouring them in the sink, or putting them in the garbage. Ask your pharmacist how you should safely and appropriately dispose of unused medications.

Summary

Metoprolol is a medication that is used to treat several conditions. It is used to treat high blood pressure, heart failure, heart attack, or angina. It is often used in treating high blood pressure along with several other medications that help to lower blood pressure.

Metoprolol is a beta-blocker, which causes the heart to beat more slowly. This decreases blood pressure and allows more blood and oxygen into the heart.

Metoprolol is only available with a prescription from your doctor.

Metoprolol can be dangerous when used by patients with certain medical conditions. Make sure your doctor knows about all the medical conditions that you have. He or she may decide not to prescribe you metoprolol, or change your dosage or the way you take it based upon your medical conditions.

Make sure you understand all the instructions you received about how to take metoprolol. If you do not understand any of these instructions, ask your doctor or pharmacist before taking metoprolol. Do not take metoprolol in any way other than how you have been instructed to take it. Do not change your dosage or stop taking metoprolol without your doctor's instructions.

Metoprolol has not been determined to be safe for pregnant women, and should only be used by pregnant women when clearly needed. If you are pregnant, talk to your doctor about the risks that metoprolol may present. Your doctor should help you determine if taking metoprolol is the right decision for you.