Olodaterol (Inhalation)

Olodaterol is an inhaled bronchodilator that helps to ease the breathing of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Overview

Olodaterol is a medication that is inhaled in spray form through the mouth. It is used in this way as a regular maintenance medication to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a family of lung diseases that blocks airflow and makes it difficult for the patient to breathe properly. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease includes diseases like emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

The use of olodaterol and other bronchodilators helps to relax the muscles that are contributing to airway restriction, and opening the breathing passages. By doing this, it helps to relieve the troubled breathing symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Olodaterol is usually used in combination with other drugs. Olodaterol does not work immediately and is not for rapid relief of breathing problems. If you have problems breathing, your doctor should also prescribe you a quick-relief inhaler such as albuterol in case of sudden breathing problems.

Olodaterol should not be used with similar long-acting inhaled beta agonists. Doing so might increase your risk of side effects. It should also not be used by patients with asthma, as it is not approved for asthma patients and may increase their risk of asthma-related death.

Olodaterol can be used by pregnant women, if it is clearly needed. If you are pregnant, you should discuss the risks with your doctor and decide together whether the benefits are worth the risks.

Olodaterol may possibly pass into the breastmilk of breastfeeding women. If you are breastfeeding, talk to your doctor about the risk of olodaterol passing into your breastmilk.

Olodaterol comes with certain health risks. For some people, olodaterol may cause QT prolongation. QT prolongation is a condition that alters the body's heart rhythm. Though QT prolongation is rarely fatal, it can cause serious symptoms like rapid or irregular heartbeat. The risk of developing QT prolongation is higher if you have certain medical conditions, or if you are an older adult. Talk to your doctor about this risk and about what symptoms you should watch out for.

Make sure you understand all of the instructions from your doctor or pharmacist about how to take olodaterol. If you do not understand any of the instructions that you have been given, talk to your doctor to clarify this information before taking olodaterol. Avoid taking olodaterol if you do not understand the risk of side effects.
If you are taking olodaterol long-term, your doctor should test your condition regularly to make sure that olodaterol is working the way it is meant to.

Condition Treated

  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Type Of Medicine

  • Adrenergic bronchodilator

Side Effects

All medications come with the risk of unwanted side effects in addition to the desirable effects that they are intended to produce. If you are uncomfortable with any of the side effects that you are experiencing, talk to your doctor about them. It is possible that he or she may be able to tell you ways in which you can prevent side effects or lessen their impact.

If you experience any of the following side effects, talk to your doctor right away:

  • Blurring of your vision
  • Breathing difficulty
  • Chest pain or tightness
  • Convulsions
  • Fruity breath odor
  • Hives
  • Increase in blood pressure
  • Increase in the frequency of urination
  • Increase in thirst
  • Large swellings on the face, eyes, mouth, throat, hands, legs, feet, or genitals
  • Racing, irregular, or rapid pulse or heartbeat
  • Swelling of the eyes, face, or nose
  • Sudden shortness of breath
  • Tingling or numbness in hands, feet, or lips
  • Unusual sweating

Other side effects may occur that do not necessarily require you to seek medical attention. However, if these side effects are persistent or start to become worse, you should talk to your doctor about them. The following side effects have been observed in some patients:

  • Back or side pain
  • Blood in urine or cloudy urine
  • Burning or pain during urination
  • Coughing
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Frequent urination
  • Joint pain
  • Nervousness
  • Rash
  • Runny nose
  • Tremor
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Unusual sneezing

It is possible that you may experience other side effects not listed here. If you ever have concerns about any side effects that you are experiencing, talk to your doctor. You may also report any side effects that you experience to the FDA at 800-FDA-1080.

Dosage

Your doctor will determine your dosage, based upon your size, medical history, and the severity of your condition. Do not change the dosage that your doctor has given you without talking to him or her about it first.

A typical dose of olodaterol is 5 mcg, or 2 actuations, inhaled two times per day. This dose is not to exceed two inhalations per 24-hour period.

Before using your olodaterol inhaler for the first time, your doctor or pharmacist will probably give you instructions for priming it. Priming is usually accomplished by inserting the cartridge into the inhaler and actuate the inhaler downwards toward the ground until a cloud becomes visible. Repeat this process three more times. At this point the inhaler will be ready for use.

To use the inhaler, breath out deeply, expelling as much air from your lungs as you can. Put the mouthpiece in your mouth and wrap your lips around it. Make sure that the entire mouthpiece is in your mouth and that your tongue or teeth are not blocking it. Actuate the inhaler firmly and fully while simultaneously taking a deep breath in through your mouth. One full breath is one puff.

If you have not used your inhaler for at least three days, actuate the inhaler once to make sure it's ready for use. If you have not used your inhaler for at least 21 days, repeat the priming process of actuating the inhaler downwards until a cloud appears four times.

Use your olodaterol at roughly the same times each day. Do not stop using it without talking to your doctor first, even if your symptoms have lessened.

If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the forgotten dose and proceed with your normal dosage schedule.

Interactions

Some medications should not be used together, as they may interact in a way that reduces their effectiveness. Make sure to tell your doctor about any other medications you are taking when he or she prescribes you olodaterol. This includes all prescriptions and over the counter medications. Do not begin taking new medications before telling your doctor or pharmacist about it, to be sure that there will not be negative interactions. Your doctor may instruct you to change the way that you are taking other medications in order to avoid negative interactions.

Some foods may interact with medicines. Ask your doctor if you need to maintain a particular diet, or if there are certain foods you should avoid when taking olodaterol.

Alcohol and tobacco use may also interact with some medicines. Share your use of alcohol and tobacco with your doctor, and ask him or her if you need to change the way you are using alcohol or tobacco while you are taking olodaterol.

Tell your doctor about your medical history and any other medical conditions that you have. There are some other medical conditions that may make taking olodaterol dangerous for you, or may mean you need to look out for certain side effects. Some other medical conditions might cause your doctor to have you take olodaterol in a different way.

Warnings

Olodaterol should not be used together with similar long-term inhaled medications. Doing so may be dangerous and increase the risk of side effects. Tell your doctor about any other medications that you are taking to treat your chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Olodaterol is not a fast-acting drug and will not help you breathe more easily in an emergency situation. It is intended for long-term maintenance use and not for an immediate rescue effect.

If you are also using a short-acting rescue inhaler while on olodaterol, tell your doctor right away if your short-acting inhaler starts to lose its effectiveness or you find yourself needing to use it more often.

Olodaterol can cause paradoxical bronchospasm in some patients. If you have paradoxical bronchospasm, your breathing problems will become worse as a result. This condition can be dangerous and you should tell your doctor right away if you are experiencing unusual coughing, difficulty breathing, wheezing, or shortness of breath after using olodaterol. Before beginning olodaterol, talk to your doctor about the risk of developing paradoxical bronchospasm and what symptoms you should be aware of.

Olodaterol and similar medications have been shown in a large study to increase the risk of asthma-related death. Talk to your doctor about this risk before taking olodaterol. Olodaterol is not approved to be used by patients with asthma, and is only considered safe for use by people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Patients with acutely deteriorating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease should not begin taking olodaterol. It is not known whether olodaterol is safe for people with acutely deteriorating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

The use of olodaterol may also cause a condition called QT prolongation, which affects the heart's rhythm. If you experience a rapid or irregular heartbeat, severe dizziness, or fainting, these may be symptoms of QT prolongation. If you experience any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor immediately. The risk of QT prolongation may be higher in those with certain medical conditions or who are taking certain other medications. For this reason, it is extremely important to tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions and medications that you are taking.

Tell your doctor if you have any of the following medical conditions:

  • Allergies
  • Diabetes
  • Heart disease
  • Heart rhythm disorder
  • High blood pressure
  • Thyroid disorder

The risk of QT prolongation may be higher in older adults. Older adults may also be at a higher risk of experiencing other side effects.

Olodaterol should not be used by pregnant women unless it is definitely needed. If you are pregnant, ask your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking olodaterol while you are pregnant.

It is possible that olodaterol can pass into the breastmilk of breastfeeding women. If you are breastfeeding, talk to your doctor about this risk. Your doctor may instruct you to stop breastfeeding while you are taking olodaterol, to avoid this risk.

Tell your doctor about all of your allergies before you start taking olodaterol. There may be inactive ingredients in the medication that you are allergic to.

If you start taking olodaterol and have any of the symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, get medical attention immediately. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction include hives, trouble breathing, and swelling of the throat, lips, face, or tongue.

If you are taking olodaterol, avoid exacerbating your breathing problem. Substances like smoke, pollen, pet dander, mold, and dust can cause irritation or allergic reactions, making breathing problems worse. The flu virus can also make breathing problems worse. You should ask your doctor or pharmacist whether or not you should get a flu vaccine every year.

Storage

Store your inhaler and cartridges in a closed container. Store them at room temperature and protect them from direct sunlight, moisture, and heat. Do not allow your olodaterol to freeze.

Make sure you keep your medications safely away from the reach of children and pets.

Do not keep your inhaler any longer than 3 months after the first time you used it.

Do not use medications that have reached their expiration date.

Do not dispose of expired or extra medications by flushing them down the toilet, pouring them in the sink, or throwing them in the garbage. Ask your pharmacist how you should appropriately dispose of any unwanted medications.

Summary

Olodaterol is an inhaled medication used to treat patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease includes diseases such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis. These diseases cause breathing issues. Olodaterol is usually one of a combination of drugs used to treat them.

Olodaterol is an adrenergic bronchodilator. This means that it works to reduce the obstruction of airways that causes difficulty breathing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this way, it eases the breathing of patients.

It is a long-term maintenance medication that does not begin working immediately. For immediate relief from an acute breathing problem, your doctor may prescribe you a fast-action inhaler or another medication. Like many medications, olodaterol comes with the risk of side effects. Monitor your side effects and talk to your doctor about them if they persist or worsen. Some side effects could indicate a dangerous reaction and mean that you should talk to your doctor immediately.

Never take medications that have reached their expiration date. Make sure that you are storing your medications correctly, and ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications appropriately. Do not allow children or pets access to medications.