Potassium Citrate (Oral)

Potassium Citrate is a prescription medication used to treat renal tubular acidosis, which is a kidney stone condition, and is used to prevent certain kinds of kidney stones and kidney complications that result from gout.

Overview

Potassium Citrate is a medication used to treat renal tubular acidosis, kidney stones, and similar kidney complications from gout. It works by making urine less acidic, which helps kidneys get rid of the uric acid that can cause kidney stones.

Conditions Treated

  • Renal Tubular Acidosis
  • Gout
  • Certain types of kidney stones

Type Of Medicine

  • Urinary alkalinizer

Side Effects

Any side effects of Potassium Citrate may be serious and should be brought to the attention of a medical professional. If you observe any of the following side effects, tell your doctor immediately:

  • Abdominal or stomach discomfort
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

Other side effects may be the result of an overdose. If you observe any of the following side effects, they may be indicative of an overdose and should be brought to the attention of a medical professional immediately:

  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Unusual nervousness
  • Confusion
  • Numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips
  • Shortness of breath
  • Feeling of weakness or heaviness in the legs

Dosage

Potassium Citrate comes in various forms, including tablets and patches.

Potassium Citrate oral should be taken with a meal or snack. Never take this medication on an empty stomach. When taking the medication, do so with a glass of water or other liquid approved by a doctor. Do not crush or chew the oral tablet, which can cause it to release too early. Do not split tablets unless directed to do so by a doctor or pharmacist. You should also not lie down for ten minutes after taking Potassium Citrate.

Depending on your condition and lifestyle, your doctor may recommend that you start a low-sodium diet and drink more fluids when taking Potassium Citrate. Always follow your doctor's advice carefully.

The dosage of Potassium Citrate oral tablets you take is dependent on your urinary citrate and the condition you are trying to treat. Urinary citrate levels should be checked every four months and dosages adjusted accordingly.

Adults trying to treat Nephrolithiasis who have a urinary citrate level of less than 150 mg/day will normally be prescribed 60 mEq/day. This dosage can be administered as either 30 mEq two times per day, 20 mEq three times per day, or 15 mEq four times per day.

Adults trying to treat Nephrolithiasis who have a urinary citrate level of greater than 150 mg/day will normally be prescribed 30 mEq/day. This dosage can be administered as either 15 mEq two times per day or 10 mEq three times per day.

The maximum recommended daily dosage for the treatment of Nephrolithias is 100/mEq per day. If you feel that you need more than this dosage to treat your condition, you should talk to your doctor about other options for treatment.

Adults trying to treat renal tubular acidosis who have a urinary citrate level of less than 150 mg/day will normally be prescribed 60 mEq/day, either 30 mEq two times per day, 20 mEq three times per day, or 15 mEq four times per day.

Adults trying to treat renal tubular acidosis who have a urinary citrate level of greater than 150 mg/day will normally be prescribed 30 mEq/day, either 15 mEq two times per day or 10 mEq three times per day).

The maximum recommended daily dosage for the treatment of renal tubular acidosis is 100/mEq per day. If you feel that you need more than this dosage to treat your condition, you should talk to your doctor about other options for treatment.

If you miss a dose of Potassium Citrate, take the dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose anyway, take it as normal. Never take two dosages at the same time.

The use of Potassium Citrate in pediatrics may be possible, but differs greatly from the recommended use for adults. You should always consult with your doctor before giving a child Potassium Citrate.

Interactions

Some drugs may interact with Potassium Citrate. Always tell your doctor about the medications and dietary supplements you are taking.

The following may interact with Potassium Citrate:

  • Antacids that contain aluminum
  • Aspirin and other salicylates
  • Some blood pressure medications
  • Drospirenone
  • Medications that slow the movement of food and other drugs through the esophagus or stomach
  • Antispasmodics such as glycopyrrolate or oxybutynin,
  • Narcotic pain medicines (such as morphine)
  • Eplerenone
  • Certain heart medications (such as quinidine, digoxin)
  • Lithium
  • Potassium supplements (including salt substitutes)
  • Pramlintide
  • Some water pills (such as amiloride, spironolactone, or triamterene)

Warnings

Hyperkalemia or high potassium in the blood may occur when you are taking Potassium Citrate. While this may not be harmful, you should watch for signs that your potassium levels are too high. Be sure to get regular blood and urine tests with your doctor. Watch for the following symptoms, which may indicate dangerously high levels of Potassium Citrate in your blood, and alert your doctor if you experience any of them:

  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • Confusion
  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Nervousness
  • Numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips
  • Weakness or heaviness of the legs

Potassium Citrate could also cause stomach problems. If you experience any of the following symptoms, you should stop taking Potassium Citrate and alert your doctor immediately:

  • Bloody or black stools
  • Constipation
  • Severe stomach pain
  • Vomiting of blood or other unusual material

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant before taking Potassium Citrate. Also tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or start breastfeeding before taking Potassium Citrate.

Do not stop taking Potassium Citrate without telling your doctor, as suddenly stopping may worsen your condition.

Potassium Citrate should always be taken with food and water. We sure to take Potassium Citrate within 30 minutes of eating or have a snack while you take it.

Storage

Potassium Citrate should be stored in a safe place, out of the reach of children. Always ensure that any child safety locks are in place and tightly fastened.

You should store Potassium Citrate in a dry place at room temperature 68°-77°F. Keep out of extreme heat or cold. It should not be in direct sunlight or in a moist environment. This means that bathrooms are often not the best place to store medications.

If you need to dispose of a prescription of Potassium Citrate, you should do so by finding a medication take-back facility or program. If you cannot find a medicine take-back program near you, you should consult the FDA's approved list of methods for disposing of this medicine. Never throw prescription medications in the regular trash bin or flush it down the toilet.

If you cannot find a medicine take-back program, the FDA recommends reading the bottle label carefully for any instructions about how to properly dispose of the medication. There may be other safe ways of disposing of Potassium Citrate.

When done with a bottle of prescription of Potassium Citrate, you can dispose of the bottle in the garbage. You should be sure to scratch off any personal details on the bottle before you throw it away.

Summary

Potassium Citrate is a prescription medication used to treat renal tubular acidosis, kidney stones, gout, and similar kidney complications by making urine less acidic.

There are a few possible side effects to taking Potassium Citrate. Any side effects should be brought to the attention of a doctor immediately:

  • Abdominal or stomach discomfort
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

Other side effects may be the result of an overdose. If you observe any other side effects, you should tell your doctor immediately. If you suspect you or someone you know has overdosed on Potassium Citrate, cal poison control or emergency services immediately.

Potassium Citrate comes in various forms, including tablets and patches.

Potassium Citrate oral should be taken with a meal or snack. Never take this medication on an empty stomach. When taking the medication, do so with a glass of water or other liquid approved by a doctor. Do not crush or chew the oral tablet, which can cause it to release too early. Do not split tablets unless directed to do so by a doctor or pharmacist. You should also not lie down for ten minutes after taking Potassium Citrate.

Depending on your condition and lifestyle, your doctor may recommend that you start a low-sodium diet and drink more fluids when taking Potassium Citrate. Always follow your doctor's advice carefully and alert them of any dietary changes while taking Potassium Citrate.

The dosage of Potassium Citrate oral tablets you take is dependent on your urinary citrate and the condition you are trying to treat. Urinary citrate levels should be checked every four months and dosages adjusted accordingly. Always follow the advice of your doctor about how much and how often to take Potassium Citrate.

Hyperkalemia or high potassium in the blood may occur when you are taking Potassium Citrate. While this may not be harmful, you should watch for signs that your potassium levels are too high. Be sure to get regular blood and urine tests with your doctor.

Do not stop taking Potassium Citrate without telling your doctor, as suddenly stopping may worsen your condition.

Potassium Citrate should always be taken with food and water. We sure to take Potassium Citrate within 30 minutes of eating or have a snack while you take it.

Potassium Citrate should be stored in a safe place, out of the reach of children. Always ensure that any child safety locks are in place and tightly fastened so that children can not open it.

You should store Potassium Citrate in a dry place at room temperature, or about 68°-77°F. Keep out of extreme heat or cold. It should not be in direct sunlight or in a moist environment. If you do not store it properly, check with a pharmacist about its safety and whether or not you should get a new prescription.