Salicylate (Oral, Rectal)

Salicylate is an ester of salicylic acid and is naturally found in some plants. Aspirin is derived from salicylic acid, and known as acetylsalicylic acid.

Overview

Salicylate is an ester, or salt, of salicylic acid. Variants of salicylate are often located in nature in the bark and leaves of certain plants (such as white willow and wintergreen). The most well-known drug to be derived from salicylic acid is aspirin, which is sometimes referred to as acetylsalicylic acid.

Both acetylsalicylic acids and salicylic acids possess antipyretic (for lowering the patient's temperature), anti-inflammatory (for reducing inflammation in the patient), and analgesic (for providing pain relief to the patient) properties.

In aspirin form, salicylate is an effective painkiller and anti-coagulant often recommended to patients suffering from blood clots, thus preventing serious conditions such as strokes or heart attacks. However, the blood-thinning effect of aspirin can also increase the risk among some patients of promoting serious bleeding issues. As such, aspirin should only be taken for the prevention of blood clots and heart attacks where it has been specifically prescribed by an examining doctor.

While most patients can tolerate salicylate-based medication with no ill effects, some others appear to be extremely sensitive to it. Additionally, even among those with no adverse reaction, salicylate drugs can be very toxic if they are consumed in suitably large quantities.

Your doctor may decide that salicylates are an appropriate treatment for other conditions not mentioned here.

Many salicylate products contain caffeine, which can boost their efficacy as pain relief medications.

While some salicylates are available without a prescription, your doctor may also choose to prescribe them for a part of your course of treatment. In any event, it is important that your doctor knows what you are taking, in order for them to decide whether to continue your course of treatment or investigate an alternative route.

Salicylates are available under a number of brand names in the United States (including: Trilisate, Tricosal, Salflex, Pepto Bismol, Pentasa, Kaopectate, Giazo, Ecotrin, Dolobid, Doans Regular, Doans Extra Strength, Dipentum, Colazal, Canasa, Bayer, Azulfidine Entabs, Azulfidine, and Amigesic) and Canada (including: Salofalk, Salazopyrin, Pms-Asa Suppository Children, Pms-Asa Suppository Adult, Pepto-Bismol, Mesasal, Compliments Bismuth - Regular Strength, Bismuth Original Formula, Bismuth Extra Strength, Asacol 800, and Arthropan).

Be sure that your prescribing doctor knows whether you are currently on a low-sodium diet. Large doses of sodium salicylate (such as may be taken by arthritis sufferers) can add large amounts of sodium into your diet.

Salicylates are available as the following forms of dosage:

  • Capsule
  • Capsule, Delayed Release
  • Capsule, Extended Release
  • Capsule, Extended Release, 24 HR
  • Enema
  • Gum
  • Liquid
  • Solution
  • Suppository
  • Suspension
  • Tablet
  • Tablet, Chewable
  • Tablet, Delayed Release
  • Tablet, Effervescent
  • Tablet, Enteric Coated
  • Tablet, Extended Release

Conditions Treated

  • Fever
  • Pain relief
  • Inflammation
  • Blood clots
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Headaches

Type of Medicine

  • Analgesic
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antipyretic
  • Anticoagulant

Side Effects

As well as its wanted effects, any medicine might result in undesirable effects. While not every effect listed here might take place, should any occur they might require some kind of medical attention.

If any of the following symptoms of salicylate overdose in children present themselves, you must seek immediate emergency help:

  • Behavioral changes
  • Severe tiredness or drowsiness
  • Deep or fast breathing

Please consult your doctor straight away should you present with any of the following effects:

  • Severe stomach or abdominal pain, burning, or cramping
  • Tarry, bloody, or black stools
  • Continuing or severe headaches
  • Continuous buzzing or ringing in the ears
  • Itching, hives, or rash on the skin
  • Unusual weakness or tiredness
  • Vomit containing material resembling coffee grounds, or containing blood

You may also exhibit side effects that often do not require any medical attention, as they tend to disappear with use, as the body adjusts itself to the medication. If any negative effects listed here should continue, or become bothersome, you should speak to your prescribing doctor:

  • Moderate or mild stomach or abdominal pain, burning, or cramping
  • Indigestion or heartburn
  • Vomiting or nausea
  • Jitters, nervousness, or difficulty sleeping (only applies to salicylate products that contain caffeine).

Should you notice any negative effects that are not listed above, be sure to check with your prescribing doctor.

Dosage

The dosage of salicylate recommended will differ from patient to patient. Always follow your doctor's directions or the instructions on the label. Information listed here shows only the average dosages of salicylates: should your prescribing doctor recommend a different dosage from those listed below, do not amend it until advised to do so by your doctor.

For aspirin

For oral dosage:

For pain or fever:

  • Adults and teenagers: 325 to 500 milligrams (mg) every three or four hours, 650 mg every four to six hours, or 1000 mg every six hours as needed.
  • Children 11 to 12 years of age—320 to 480 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children 9 to 11 years of age—320 to 400 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children 6 to 9 years of age—320 to 325 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children 4 to 6 years of age—240 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children 2 to 4 years of age—160 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For arthritis:

  • Adults and teenagers: A total of 3600 to 5400 mg a day, divided into several smaller doses.
  • Children: A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.
  • For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:
  • Adults: Most people will take 81, 162.5, or 325 mg a day or 325 mg every other day. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
  • Children: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For oral dosage chewing gum:

For pain:

  • Adults and teenagers: 2 tablets every four hours as needed.
  • Children 6 to 12 years of age: 1 or 2 tablets (227 mg each) up to four times a day.
  • Children 3 to 6 years of age: 1 tablet (227 mg) up to three times a day.
  • Children up to 3 years of age: Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For long-acting oral dosage (extended-release tablets):

For pain:

  • Adults and teenagers:1 or 2 tablets twice a day.
  • Children: The long-acting aspirin tablets are too strong for use in children.

For arthritis:

  • Adults and teenagers: 1 or 2 tablets twice a day, at first. Your doctor will then adjust your dose as needed.
  • Children: The long-acting aspirin tablets are too strong for use in children.

For rectal dosage suppositories:

For pain or fever:

  • Adults and teenagers: 325 to 650 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children 11 to 12 years of age: 325 to 480 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children 9 to 11 years of age: 325 to 400 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children 6 to 9 years of age: 325 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children 4 to 6 years of age: 240 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children 2 to 4 years of age: 160 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children up to 2 years of age: Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For arthritis:

  • Adults and teenagers: A total of 3600 to 5400 mg a day, divided into several smaller doses.
  • Children: A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

For aspirin and caffeine

For oral dosage capsule:

For pain or fever:

  • Adults and teenagers: 325 to 500 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
  • Children 9 to 12 years of age: 325 to 400 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children 6 to 9 years of age: 325 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children up to 6 years of age: Aspirin and caffeine capsules are too strong for use in children up to 6 years of age

For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:

  • Adults: 325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
  • Children: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For oral dosage tablets:

For pain or fever:

  • Adults and teenagers: 325 to 500 mg of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
  • Children 9 to 12 years of age: 325 to 400 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children up to 9 years of age: Aspirin and caffeine tablets are too strong for use in children up to 9 years of age.

For arthritis:

  • Adults and teenagers: A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
  • Children: —A total of 80 to 100 mg per kg (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:

  • Adults: 325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
  • Children: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For buffered aspirin

For oral dosage tablets:

For pain or fever:

  • Adults and teenagers: 325 to 500 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 1000 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
  • Children 11 to 12 years of age: One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
  • Children 9 to 11 years of age: One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
  • Children 6 to 9 years of age: One 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
  • Children 4 to 6 years of age: Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
  • Children 2 to 4 years of age: One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
  • Children up to 2 years of age: Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For arthritis:

  • Adults and teenagers: A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
  • Children: A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:

  • Adults: 325 mg a day or every other day. People who take smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
  • Children: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For buffered aspirin and caffeine

For oral dosage tablets:

For pain or fever:

  • Adults and teenagers: 325 or 421 milligrams (mg) of aspirin every three or four hours, 650 mg of aspirin every four to six hours, or 842 mg of aspirin every six hours as needed.
  • Children 11 to 12 years of age: One or one and one-half 325-mg tablets, or one 421-mg tablet, every four hours as needed.
  • Children 9 to 11 years of age: One or one and one-fourth 325-mg tablets every four hours as needed.
  • Children 6 to 9 years of age: One 325-mg or 421-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
  • Children 4 to 6 years of age: Three-fourths of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
  • Children 2 to 4 years of age: One-half of a 325-mg tablet every four hours as needed.
  • Children up to 2 years of age: Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For arthritis:

  • Adults and teenagers: A total of 3600 to 5400 mg of aspirin a day, divided into several smaller doses.
  • Children: A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

For preventing a heart attack, stroke, or other problems caused by blood clots:

  • Adults: 162.5 or 325 mg (one-half or one 325-mg tablet) a day or 325 mg every other day. People who need smaller doses of aspirin will have to use a different product. Some people taking aspirin to prevent a stroke may need as much as 1000 mg a day.
  • Children: Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For choline salicylate

For oral dosage oral solution:

For pain or fever:

  • Adults and teenagers: One-half or three-fourths of a teaspoonful every three hours, one-half or one teaspoonful every four hours, or one or one and one-half teaspoonfuls every six hours as needed.
  • Children 11 to 12 years of age: 2.5 to 3.75 mL (one-half to three-fourths of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
  • Children 6 to 11 years of age: 2.5 mL (one-half of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special measuring spoon.
  • Children 4 to 6 years of age: 1.66 mL every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
  • Children 2 to 4 years of age: 1.25 milliliters (mL) (one-fourth of a teaspoonful) every four hours as needed. This amount should be measured by a special dropper or measuring spoon.
  • Children up to 2 years of age: Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For arthritis:

  • Adults: A total of five and one-half to eight teaspoonfuls a day, divided into several smaller doses.
  • Children: A total of 0.6 to 0.7 mL per kilogram (kg) (0.25 to 0.28 mL per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

For choline and magnesium salicylates

For oral dosage solution or tablets:

For pain or fever:

  • Adults and teenagers: A total of 2000 to 3000 milligrams (mg) a day, divided into two or three doses.
  • Children weighing more than 37 kg (90 pounds or more): 2200 mg a day, divided into two doses.
  • Children weighing up to 37 kilograms (kg) (about 89 pounds): A total of 50 mg per kg (20 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into two doses.

For magnesium salicylate

For oral dosage form tablets:

For pain:

  • Adults and teenagers: 2 regular-strength tablets every four hours, up to a maximum of 12 tablets a day, or 2 extra-strength tablets every eight hours, up to a maximum of 8 tablets a day.
  • Children: Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For salsalate

For oral dosage capsules or tablets:

For arthritis:

  • Adults and teenagers: 500 to 1000 milligrams (mg) two or three times a day, to start. Your doctor will then adjust your dose as needed.
  • Children: Dose must be determined by your doctor.

For sodium salicylate

For oral dosage tablets or delayed-release [enteric-coated] tablets:

For pain or fever:

  • Adults and teenagers: 325 or 650 milligrams (mg) every four hours as needed.
  • Children 6 years of age and older: 325 mg every four hours as needed.
  • Children up to 6 years of age: This medicine is too strong for use in children younger than 6 years of age.

For arthritis:

  • Adults and teenagers: A total of 3600 to 5400 mg a day, divided into several smaller doses.
  • Children: A total of 80 to 100 mg per kilogram (kg) (32 to 40 mg per pound) of body weight a day, divided into several smaller doses.

If you happen to miss a dosage of salicylate, you should take it at the earliest opportunity. However, should it be nearly time for the next dosage, you ought to skip your missed dosage and return to your normal schedule of dosing. Under no circumstances should you double the dose.

Interactions

While there are some medications that ought never be utilized alongside one another, in any event, there might be other circumstances where a pair of different drugs can be taken concurrently, even though an interaction is known as likely to occur. In such a situation, your prescribing doctor might choose to amend your dosage, or could recommend further precautions. While taking salicylates, it is essential that your examining doctor is aware that you take any other medication, particularly the ones listed beneath. These interactions are listed here based on the likelihood of their occurrence and potential significance. This list is not necessarily exhaustive.

Using salicylates alongside any of these drugs listed below would not be recommended. Your prescribing doctor might choose not to give you salicylates for this particular course of treatment, or might choose instead to alter the other drugs that you take.

  • Methenamine
  • Ketorolac
  • Live Influenza Virus Vaccine
  • Dichlorphenamide
  • Defibrotide

Using salicylates alongside the following drugs is normally not recommended. However, it might be necessary in some circumstances. Should both medications be prescribed at the same time, your prescribing doctor might amend the dosage of salicylates or the other drug, or they might choose to amend how often a dosage should be taken.

  • Xipamide
  • Warfarin
  • Vortioxetine
  • Vorapaxar
  • Vilazodone
  • Venlafaxine
  • Varicella Virus Vaccine
  • Valdecoxib
  • Trimipramine
  • Trichlormethiazide
  • Triamterene
  • Treprostinil
  • Torsemide
  • Tolmetin
  • Tolfenamic Acid
  • Tolbutamide
  • Tolazamide
  • Tirofiban
  • Tinzaparin
  • Ticlopidine
  • Ticagrelor
  • Tiaprofenic Acid
  • Tianeptine
  • Tenoxicam
  • Tacrolimus
  • Sulindac
  • Spironolactone
  • Sodium Salicylate
  • Sibutramine
  • Sertraline
  • Salsalate
  • Salicylic Acid
  • Rofecoxib
  • Rivaroxaban
  • Riluzole
  • Reviparin
  • Reteplase, Recombinant
  • Repaglinide
  • Reboxetine
  • Protriptyline
  • Protein C
  • Proquazone
  • Propyphenazone
  • Proglumetacin
  • Prednisone
  • Prednisolone
  • Prasugrel
  • Pranoprofen
  • Pralatrexate
  • Polythiazide
  • Piroxicam
  • Piracetam
  • Piketoprofen
  • Phenylbutazone
  • Phenprocoumon
  • Phenindione
  • Pentoxifylline
  • Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium
  • Pemetrexed
  • Paroxetine
  • Parnaparin
  • Parecoxib
  • Paramethasone
  • Oxyphenbutazone
  • Oxaprozin
  • Opipramol
  • Nortriptyline
  • Nimesulide Beta Cyclodextrin
  • Nimesulide
  • Niflumic Acid
  • Nepafenac
  • Nefazodone
  • Nateglinide
  • Naproxen
  • Nadroparin
  • Nabumetone
  • Morniflumate
  • Milnacipran
  • Metolazone
  • Methylprednisolone
  • Methyclothiazide
  • Methotrexate
  • Metformin
  • Mercaptopurine
  • Meloxicam
  • Melitracen
  • Mefenamic Acid
  • Meclofenamate
  • Meadowsweet
  • Lumiracoxib
  • Loxoprofen
  • Lornoxicam
  • Lofepramine
  • Lithium
  • Levomilnacipran
  • Lepirudin
  • Ketoprofen
  • Indomethacin
  • Indapamide
  • Imipramine
  • Iloprost
  • Ibuprofen
  • Hydroflumethiazide
  • Hydrocortisone
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Heparin
  • Gossypol
  • Glyburide
  • Glipizide
  • Glimepiride
  •  Ginkgo
  • Furosemide
  • Fondaparinux
  • Fluvoxamine
  • Flurbiprofen
  • Fluoxetine
  • Fluocortolone
  • Flufenamic Acid
  • Floctafenine
  • Feverfew
  • Feprazone
  • Fepradinol
  • Fenoprofen
  • Felbinac
  • Etoricoxib
  • Etofenamate
  • Etodolac
  • Ethacrynic Acid
  • Escitalopram
  • Eptifibatide
  • Epoprostenol
  • Eplerenone
  • Enoxaparin
  • Edoxaban
  • Duloxetine
  • Droxicam
  • Doxepin
  • Dothiepin
  • Dipyrone
  • Dipyridamole
  • Digoxin
  • Diflunisal
  • Dicumarol
  • Diclofenac
  • Dibenzepin
  • Diazoxide
  • Dexketoprofen
  • Dexibuprofen
  • Dexamethasone
  • Desvenlafaxine
  • Desirudin
  • Desipramine
  • Deflazacort
  • Danaparoid
  • Dalteparin
  • Dabigatran Etexilate
  • Cyclosporine
  • Cyclopenthiazide
  • Cortisone
  • Clopidogrel
  • Clopamide
  • Clonixin
  • Clomipramine
  • Citalopram
  • Cilostazol
  • Choline Salicylate
  • Chlorthalidone
  • Chlorpropamide
  • Chlorothiazide
  • Certoparin
  • Celecoxib
  • Cangrelor
  • Bumetanide
  • Bufexamac
  • Budesonide
  • Bromfenac
  • Bivalirudin
  • Betamethasone
  • Beta Glucan
  • Benzthiazide
  • Bendroflumethiazide
  • Bemiparin
  • Azathioprine
  • Aspirin
  • Argatroban
  • Ardeparin
  • Apixaban
  • Anisindione
  • Anagrelide
  • Amtolmetin Guacil
  • Amoxapine
  • Amitriptylinoxide
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amineptine
  • Amiloride
  • Alteplase, Recombinant
  • Alipogene Tiparvovec
  • Acenocoumarol
  • Acemetacin
  • Aceclofenac
  • Acarbose
  • Abciximab

Some medications ought never be used during a time when you are eating food or, even when consuming particular kinds of food, as negative interactions could occur. Using tobacco or alcohol while taking some medications can also result in negative interactions. If you have any questions concerning your use of tobacco, alcohol, or food alongside salicylates, you should discuss the same with your healthcare professional.

Warnings

When taking any medication you need to weigh the risk of taking it against the positive effect it will have on your condition, following a suitable consultation with your prescribing doctor. When recommended to take salicylates, you need to consider the following points.

Inform your doctor should you have had an allergic or other unusual reaction to salicylate-based medicine in the past or any other kind of medication. You should also inform your prescribing doctor in the event that you suffer from any other kind of allergies, including allergies to preservatives, foods, animals, or dyes.

Aspirin ought not to be given to children or teenagers exhibiting fever, or other symptoms indicative of a viral infection (this includes chickenpox and flu particularly) until you have first discussed its use with the child's physician. This is essential, as salicylate-based drugs can result in a serious condition known as Reye's syndrome in teenagers as children when taken by children with viral fevers.

Some children might be required to take aspirin on a regular basis (for arthritis, for instance). Your child's prescribing doctor might wish to cease the course of treatment for a short period, should the child exhibit symptoms of a viral infection, including a fever. This ought to be discussed with the child's doctor, in order to know in advance what you need to do should your child become sick.

Children who are not suffering from a viral infection might nonetheless be more susceptible to the impact of salicylates, particularly if they exhibit a fever, or should they have lost significant amounts of bodily fluids as a consequence of sweating, diarrhea, or vomiting. This can raise the risk of developing unwanted side effects throughout their course of treatment.

The elderly are particularly susceptible to the impact of salicylates, and this can increase the potential risk of side effects presenting themselves throughout the patient's course of treatment.

There have been no studies to indicate that salicylates cause birth defects among human fetuses. Studies regarding birth defects among human subjects have been conducted on aspirin, but have not been conducted with other salicylate-based drugs. Salicylates have been shown to cause birth defects in studies on animal subjects.

Certain reports suggest that too high an intake of aspirin during the late stages of pregnancy might result in a decrease of the weight of the newborn, or possibly even the death of the newborn infant, or fetus. That said, the mothers under study in the reports had been shown to have taken far larger quantities of aspirin than would normally be recommended. Studies conducted on mothers who took aspirin in doses that would normally be recommended showed no signs of these unwanted side effects. There does, however, remain the possibility that the regular use of salicylate-based drugs might result in unwanted side effects upon the blood flow or the heart of newborn infants and fetuses.

The use of salicylates-based medicine, particularly aspirin, throughout the final two weeks of your pregnancy can cause bleeding issues in the fetus either during or prior to delivery, and also in a newborn infant. Further, excessive usage of salicylates throughout the final three months of your pregnancy can lengthen the duration of your pregnancy, prolong your labor, create other issues during your delivery, or result in severe bleeding to you either before, during, or following the delivery of your child. You are advised not to take aspirin or other salicylates through the three months prior to delivery unless your doctor specifically recommends it.

Studies among humans do not show that caffeine (which is present in certain aspirin products) results in birth defects. However, there have been studies conducted in animals which indicate that caffeine can cause birth defects if consumed in very large quantities (the equivalent of 12 to 24 cups per day of coffee).

Salicylates can pass into breast milk. While they have not been shown to cause any issues in nursing infants, there is a possibility of problems occurring if regular, large quantities are taken, as is the case with patients being prescribed for rheumatism or arthritis.

Caffeine can pass into a patient's breast milk in small quantities.

Take salicylates with food, or immediately following meals, as this will lessen any irritation to the stomach.

Take oral capsules or tablets of salicylates with an eight-ounce glass of water. Additionally, you should not attempt to lie down until 15 to 30 minutes have passed. This will help to prevent any irritation which might lead to difficulty in swallowing.

For patients taking aspirin:

  • Do not take any aspirin product that has a strong, vinegary odor, as this indicates that the medication has started to break down. Should you have concerns about this, be sure to consult your prescribing doctor.
  • If you take any aspirin-based medication within seven days of having a tooth extracted, tonsils removed, or any other mouth or dental surgery, it is important that you swallow the tablet or capsule whole. It is inadvisable to chew aspirin during this time.
  • Do not put any aspirin-based medication directly onto a tooth or the surface of a gum, as it can result in a burn.
  • There are a number of varieties of aspirin and buffered aspirin oral tablets. If you take:
    • chewable aspirin oral tablets, you can swallow them whole, dissolve them in liquid, crush them, or chew them.
    • delayed-release aspirin oral tablets, you must swallow them whole. Do not attempt to break them apart, or crush them prior to ingesting.
    • extended-release aspirin oral tablets, speak to your pharmacist about how you should take them. Some can be broken up (although not crushed) prior to swallowing if a whole tablet proves difficult to swallow. Other brands ought not to be broken at all, and should always be swallowed whole.

To use aspirin in suppository form:

  • If it is too soft for you to easily insert, you should chill the suppository in a refrigerator for approximately thirty minutes, or you can run the suppository under a cold tap, prior to removing its foil wrapper.
  • When inserting the suppository, you should firstly remove its foil wrapper entirely, before moistening the suppository with a little cold water. Then, lying on your side, you should use a finger to push it well into your rectum.

To take a magnesium and choline salicylates oral solution:

  • The liquid product can be mixed with fruit juice prior to ingestion.
  • Consume an eight-ounce glass of water immediately after you take the medication.

To take enteric-coated sodium salicylate oral tablets:

  • These particular tablets have to be swallowed whole. You should not break them up, nor crush prior to taking them.

Unless directed otherwise by your dentist, or prescribing doctor:

  • Do not ingest more than recommended by the drug's label, as this will lessen the possibility of presenting with negative effects.
  • Children under the age of thirteen ought not to take any salicylate-based medication more frequently than five times in any given day.

Consult your dentist, or prescribing doctor:

  • If you take salicylates for pain relief and it lasts longer than ten days (or five days, if the patient is a child), gets worse during your course of treatment, if you present with new symptoms, or you develop redness or swelling. Any of these things might be signs of a serious medical treatment which requires urgent treatment.
  • If taking salicylates to treat a sore throat, and it becomes extremely painful, lasts longer than a couple of days, or occurs alongside vomiting, nausea, skin rashes, headaches, or fever.
  • If taking salicylates regularly (for instance, if prescribed it for arthritis), and notice a buzzing or ringing in the ears, or continuous or severe headaches. Such symptoms are the initial signs of too high an intake of salicylate. Your prescribing doctor might choose to amend the dosage of medicine you need to take each day.

For patients who take aspirin to reduce the risk of strokes, heart attacks, or other conditions that result from having blood clots:

  • Only ever take only the dosage prescribed by your doctor. Should you require a medicine for relieving pain, arthritis, or a fever, your prescribing doctor might not wish you to be taking further aspirin. This is something you ought to discuss with a healthcare professional, in order to be aware, ahead of time, the sort of medication you can take.
  • You shouldn't cease your treatment with salicylates before first consulting with your prescribing doctor.

Taking some medicines alongside a salicylate-based drug can increase the risk of presenting with unwanted effects. The amount of risk depends upon the quantity of each medication that you take in a given day and the length of time that you use the drugs concurrently. Should your prescribing doctor instruct you to take a particular combination of medication regularly, at the same time, you must follow their instructions with great care. That being said, you should take these listed medications concurrently with any salicylate-based drug for longer than a couple of days, unless specifically directed to do so by your prescribing doctor, and so long as the doctor is monitoring your progress carefully.

  • Tolmetin (e.g., Tolectin)
  • Tiaprofenic acid (e.g., Surgam)
  • Tenoxicam (e.g., Mobiflex)
  • Sulindac (e.g., Clinoril)
  • Piroxicam (e.g., Feldene)
  • Phenylbutazone (e.g., Butazolidin)
  • Oxaprozin (e.g., Daypro)
  • Naproxen (e.g., Naprosyn)
  • Nabumetone (e.g., Relafen)
  • Mefenamic acid (e.g., Ponstel)
  • Meclofenamate (e.g., Meclomen)
  • Ketorolac (e.g., Toradol)
  • Ketoprofen (e.g., Orudis)
  • Indomethacin (e.g., Indocin)
  • Ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin)
  • Flurbiprofen, oral (e.g., Ansaid)
  • Floctafenine (e.g., Idarac)
  • Fenoprofen (e.g., Nalfon)
  • Etodolac (e.g., Lodine)
  • Diflunisal (e.g., Dolobid)
  • Diclofenac (e.g., Voltaren)
  • Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol)

For diabetic patients:

False results may occur during urine sugar tests, should you regularly take large doses of salicylates, as detailed below:

  • Aspirin: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), or 3 or more 800-mg (or higher strength), doses a day.
  • Buffered aspirin or Sodium salicylate: 8 or more 325-mg (5-grain), or 4 or more 500-mg or 650-mg (10-grain), doses a day.
  • Choline salicylate: 4 or more teaspoonfuls (each teaspoonful containing 870 mg) a day.
  • Choline and magnesium salicylates: 5 or more 500-mg tablets or teaspoonfuls, 4 or more 750-mg tablets, or 2 or more 1000-mg tablets, a day.
  • Magnesium salicylate: 7 or more regular-strength, or 4 or more extra-strength, tablets a day.
  • Salsalate: 4 or more 500-mg doses, or 3 or more 750-mg doses, a day.

Occasional or smaller doses of salicylates will not usually affect your urine sugar tests. That said, you ought to consult your prescribing doctor (particularly in the event that your diabetes has not been well-controlled) should any of the following statements be true.

  • You do not know how much medication you take each day.
  • You notice a change to the results of your urine sugar tests.
  • There are any further questions you have regarding this potential issue.

Be sure not to take aspirin at least five days prior to any surgical procedure (this includes dental surgery) unless your dentist or medical doctor advises otherwise. The ingestion of aspirin during this period can result in bleeding problems that can complicate the surgery.

For patients who take buffered aspirin, magnesium and choline salicylates (such as Trilisate), or magnesium salicylates (such as Doan's):

  • Magnesium salicylate, choline and magnesium salicylates, or buffered aspiriin has been shown to prevent numerous other drugs (particularly those used in the treatment of infections) from working the way they should. This can be resolved by leaving a suitable gap between taking the two different medications. Speak with your prescribing doctor to determine how large a gap you should leave,

If you are taking a laxative containing cellulose, take the salicylate at least 2 hours before or after you take the laxative. Taking these medicines too close together may lessen the effects of the salicylate.

For patients taking medication by mouth:

  • Stomach issues could be more likely to present themselves should you drink alcohol during your course of treatment, particularly if you have been taking salicylate in large doses, or over an extended period of time.

For patients who are taking aspirin suppositories:

  • Suppositories can result in an irritation to the rectum. Should this occur, be sure to check with your prescribing doctor.

Salicylates have been known to interfere with the results of certain medical tests. Before taking any medical examinations, inform the doctor whether you have used any of the following medications in the previous week. Where possible, check with the examining doctor beforehand, to make sure if your medication can be used the week prior to the examination.

For patients who are taking a product containing caffeine:

  • Caffeine can interfere with the results of any medical test using adenosine (Adenocard) or dipyridamole (Persantine) to assist in finding out the way your blood flows through particular blood vessels. Therefore, be sure not to take any caffeine products at least eight to twelve hours prior to the test.

If you believe that you or someone else has taken an overdose, you should immediately seek emergency help. An overdose of salicylate medicine can cause unconsciousness and even death. Signs of an overdose include deep or fast breathing, severe nervousness or excitement, severe tiredness or drowsiness, buzzing or ringing in the ears, confusion, hearing loss, or seizures (convulsions).

Certain medical conditions can have an impact on the efficacy of salicylates. Be sure that your prescribing doctor is aware of any medical conditions you have, but particularly any of those listed here.

Salicylates ought to be used with caution in patients suffering from any of the conditions listed below, as they might make the condition worse.

  • Anemia
  • Overactive thyroid
  • Stomach problems, including stomach ulcers

Salicylates ought to be used with caution in patients suffering from any of the conditions listed below, as the chance of exhibiting negative effects might increase.

  • History of nasal polyps, allergies, and asthma
  • A deficiency of G6PD (that is, Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase)
  • Hypertension, or high blood pressure
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver disease

Salicylates should not be used by patients suffering from any of the conditions listed below, as it has been shown to make the condition worse, whilst also lessening the positive impact of some medications used to treat the condition.

  • Gout

Salicylates ought to be used with caution in patients suffering from any of the conditions listed below, as the chance of exhibiting negative effects might increase. Additionally, the caffeine found in a number of aspirin products could worsen the effects of certain types of this condition.

  • Heart disease

Salicylates ought to be used with caution in patients suffering from any of the conditions listed below, as the chance of a patient bleeding can be increased, particularly if the patient is taking aspirin.

  • Haemophilia, or any other kind of bleeding disorder

Storage

All salicylate should be stored in a secure container. It should be kept from freezing at all times and stored at room temperature. Ensure that you keep your supply of salicylates away from direct light, moisture, and heat.

Salicylate should always be kept beyond the reach of children.

If you no longer require your salicylate, or if it should become outdated, you should not keep it.

Summary

Salicylate is a salt of salicylic acid. Originating in plants like the wintergreen and white willow. The most well-known derivative of salicylic acid is aspirin, sometimes referred to as acetylsalicylic acid.

Salicylates cause their effect by lowering the patient's temperature, reducing inflammation, and providing pain relief to the patient.

As aspirin, salicylate is an effective painkiller, and anticoagulant, and is regularly prescribed to patients who suffer from blood clots. This can help prevent serious conditions, including heart attacks and strokes. However, aspirin's blood-thinning properties can increase the risk of serious bleeding issues among certain patients, and so should only be taken for these conditions when specifically prescribed.

Salicylate-based medication has proven to have severe negative effects on some patients with a sensitivity to it. Furthermore, salicylate drugs have been shown to be very toxic if taken in large quantities.

While some salicylates are available without prescription, your doctor may also choose to prescribe them for a part of your course of treatment. In any event, it is important that your doctor knows what you are taking, in order for them to decide whether to continue your course of treatment or investigate an alternative route.

 

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Last Reviewed:
February 01, 2018
Last Updated:
February 10, 2018